Department of English

Welcome to The Department of English at BATNA University

December 2018

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31      

Calendar Calendar

A Guide For Creative Thinking

Thu Sep 17, 2009 3:12 am by BHSoft

A Guide For Creative Thinking by Brian Tracy
Einstein once said, “Every child is born a genius.” But the reason why most people do not function at genius levels is because they are not aware of how creative and smart they really are.I call it the “Schwarzenegger effect.” No one would look at a person such as Arnold Schwarzenegger and think how lucky he is to have been born with such …


Africain Literature

Wed Mar 04, 2009 8:15 pm by Lily

Things Fall Apart is a 1959 English-language novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first African novels written in English to receive global critical acclaim. The title of the novel comes from [url=http://www.answers.com/topic/william-butler-yeats-3]


Algeria's Newspapers ...

Wed Mar 04, 2009 1:11 pm by Lily

study study study study



http://www.algeria press.com/
http://www.algeria press.com/alkhabar.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elwatan.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/echoroukonline.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elmoudjahid.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/liberte.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/horizons.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/el-massa.htm
[url=http://www.algeria-press.com/ech-chaab.htm]…


Algerian Vote

Thu Apr 09, 2009 12:39 pm by Lily

Algerians are voting in a presidential election which opposition groups have described as a charade.












American English

Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:00 pm by Maria

Going to is pronounced GONNA when it is used to show the future. But it is never reduced when it means going from one place to another.

We're going to grab a bite to eat. = We're gonna grab a bite to eat.
I'm going to the office tonight. = I'm going to the office tonight.

2. Want to and want a are both pronounced WANNA and wants to is pronounced WANSTA. Do you want to can also be reduced …

American Slangs

Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:54 pm by Maria

airhead: stupid person.
"Believe it or not, Dave can sometimes act like an airhead!"

amigo: friend (from Spanish).
"I met many amigos at Dave's ESL Cafe."

ammunition: toilet paper.
"Help! We're completely out of ammunition!"

antifreeze: alcohol.
"I'm going to need a lot of antifreeze tonight!"

armpit: dirty, unappealing place.


An Introduction to the British Civilization

Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:54 am by Maria

University of Batna First Year
English Department G: 6-7-8-9
General Culture

[center]An Introduction to the British Civilization

*The United Kingdom :

Full Name : The UK's full and official name is the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".

Location: The United Kingdom (UK) of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country …

Announcements and News

Thu Mar 05, 2009 2:55 am by Lily


"Dear students , we would like to inform you that , from now on , your marks can be consulted through your Website ...Let's surf ! bounce bounce Wink

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

Sun Apr 12, 2009 11:32 pm by Lily

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

The process of applying for a research studentship begins with the identification of a potential supervisor. If you already know a staffmember who is willing to work with you to develop a research proposal,please start by contacting them. If you do not have a supervisor inmind already, …



    Spotlight on ..

    Share
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Sun Jun 21, 2009 9:37 am


    Happy Father's Day
    Moms had their day; now it's time for the dads. Just as Mother's Day comes first in the calendar year, it was first on the calendar, period. No one thought seriously of taking a day to honor fathers until a woman named Sonora Smart Dodd, sitting in a church service on Mother's Day, thought of her father, who acted as both father and mother to his six children after his wife's death years earlier. It occurred to her that he deserved to be honored every bit as much as the mothers of the world. She arranged for a tribute to her father in 1910, and began a campaign to declare an official annual holiday in honor of the fathers. Though a bill was introduced in 1913, it was only in 1972 that President Richard Nixon made Father's Day an official holiday in America. Here's to the fathers!
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Sat Jun 20, 2009 10:41 am


    Lizzie Borden
    On a hot August day in 1892, someone took an axe and brutally murdered Andrew and Abby Borden of
    Fall River, Massachusetts. Circumstantial evidence pointed a finger of guilt at Andrew's 32-year-old daughter Lizzie; some ten months later, she was brought to trial for the crime. The national press had a field day with the story of the spinster schoolteacher and the particularly heinous way her father and stepmother met their demise. The defense rested largely on the issue of reasonable doubt. No one could explain how Lizzie could have accomplished the murders without splattering herself with blood, or how she could clean herself up so quickly. On this date in 1893, the jury found Lizzie Borden innocent of the axe murders of her father and stepmother.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Fri Jun 19, 2009 7:48 pm


    Making the Putt View Poster
    Golf enthusiasts have gathered in Farmingdale, NY, for this year's US Open. Reigning champion Tiger Woods is looking for a repeat of his last appearance in a US Open at Bethpage State Park. It was in 2002, the first time a publicly owned and operated golf course was chosen to host the US Open, and the event drew record-breaking crowds. Woods — the only golfer to score under par — won the tournament. Today, round two tees off on the park's Black Course, considered one of the most difficult golf courses in America. The first winner of a US Open (in 1895) was 21-year-old Horace Rawlins; he took home $150 in prize money. This year's winner will receive $1.5 million.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Thu Jun 18, 2009 4:03 pm


    Playing Vinyl View Poster
    Remember vinyl records? How about cassette tapes? Eight-tracks? Reel-to-reel? Have you ever used an actual dial phone? Remember when there was no remote control and you had to get up and change the channel on your television? On this date in 1948, Columbia Records unveiled its new 12-inch long-playing 33⅓ rpm innovation meant that an album could hold phonograph record made of vinyl. The more than one or two songs per side, thus revolutionizing the record industry. It became the industry standard for the next fifty years, until CDs and MP3s began to make vinyl records obsolete.

    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Wed Jun 17, 2009 7:08 pm


    Iceland's Highest Mountain View Poster

    Though its name doesn't suggest it, Iceland is one of the world's most active volcanic regions: about one-third of the world's lava flow has spewed from volcanoes in Iceland. Warmed by the North Atlantic Drift, the island's climate is fairly mild considering its latitude. Some more facts about Iceland: Its parliament, the Althing, is the world's oldest functioning legislative body. In 2007, the UN's Human Development Index ranked Iceland as the world's most developed country. It's ranked among the most egalitarian, literate and productive countries per capita. At one time a part of Norway and later Denmark, Iceland declared its full independence 65 years ago today, in 1944. Sveinn Björnsson was the new republic's first president.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Tue Jun 16, 2009 10:14 pm


    Statue of James Joyce
    Dublin, Ireland
    View Poster
    On June 16, 1904, Leopold Bloom set out on his own personal day-long odyssey in James Joyce'sUlysses. Joyce patterned his book on Homer'sThe Odyssey, and Bloom and the Greek hero Odysseus (Ulysses) have similar experiences. It took Joyce some seven years to complete the novel; he worked on it from 1914-1921. The Little Review began to publish it as a serial in 1918 until protesters, outraged by some of the episodes in the story, brought obscenity charges against the editors of the journal. In 1919, the book was banned in England and two years later censors outlawed it in the US. Early in the 1930s, the ruling was reversed. Ulysses is now considered one of the prominent pieces of literature in the English language. Happy Bloomsday!
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Mon Jun 15, 2009 2:50 pm


    Signing the Magna Carta View Poster
    The Magna Carta was a historic agreement made between King John of England and his barons, who had been rebelling against his capricious and oppressive rules. When the barons defeated John in London, in May 1215, he realized he needed to negotiate with them to regain control. The next month, on June 15, he signed the Magna Carta at Runnymede as a stalling action. The document guaranteed the rights of the church and dealt with finances and a tightening of the king's ability to exploit loopholes in feudal customs. Only the last clause dealt with the people's rights under common law. This clause, which became the foundation of English constitutional liberty, is what remains in the statute books today.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Sun Jun 14, 2009 3:30 pm


    Flag of the United States View Poster
    June 14 is Flag Day in the United States. It has been 232 years since the Stars and Stripes was officially adopted as the nation's flag. The first Flag Act called for the flag to consist of 13 stripes, alternating red and white, and 13 stars, representing the 13 colonies, which would be white on a blue background. In 1818, the design was adapted to include a star for each state. The term "Stars and Stripes," coined by Marquis de Lafayette to describe the United States, became a common nickname for the country's flag. Later, the name "Old Glory" was used by ship captain William Driver for a flag that was presented to him as a gift and that he fought to protect.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Sat Jun 13, 2009 10:33 am


    Miranda rights View Poster
    You have the right to remain silent.... The US Supreme Court guaranteed the rights of a suspect not to incriminate himself while in police custody, when it ruled for the defense in Miranda V. Arizona on this date in 1966. Ernesto Miranda was one of four defendants in the case, all of whom were appealing convictions based on the fact that they claimed not to have been informed of their rights to an attorney when being questioned by the police. The decision ensures that police will read suspects their Miranda rights before beginning questioning.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Fri Jun 12, 2009 12:01 pm


    Anne Frank View Poster
    "I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are still truly good at heart..." So wrote one of the Holocaust's most famous victims, Anne Frank, in the diary she kept during her two years of hiding in the place she called the Secret Annex. Of the eight residents who lived in the hidden rooms at 263 Prinsengracht, Amsterdam, only Anne's father, Otto Frank, was to survive the war. Upon his return, Otto was given the pages of the diary that Anne had left behind when she and the others were sent to concentration camps in 1944. He published the book first in Dutch and German, under the title Het Achterhuis (The Annex), in 1947. Later translated into English as Diary of a Young Girl, the book personalized an event whose enormity was nearly impossible to absorb. Had she lived, Anne Frank would have turned 80 today.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Thu Jun 11, 2009 11:47 am


    Great Barrier Reef View Poster
    Corals are small, sedentary, marine animals with a calcareous, horny skeleton. They thrive in warm, shallow water and grow into large colonies, called coral reefs. The world's largest coral reef is the Great Barrier Reef, off the coast of Queensland, Australia. British captain James Cook came upon the reef on this date in 1770, when his ship, the HMS Endeavor, ran aground on a shoal in the area. The Great Barrier Reef, reaching over 2,000 km/1,250 mi long, is the largest single structure made by living organisms. UNESCO declared the reef — home to hundreds of species of fish, birds and marine animals — a World Heritage Site in 1981.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Wed Jun 10, 2009 4:45 pm


    W00t
    Source
    Thomas Jefferson did it and should not be belittled, as did George Bush, who cannot be misunderestimated. Some say Shakespeare was the master, but Lewis Carroll would be the first to chortle at that. It can be done cleverly (like Stephen Colbert with truthiness) or by accident (cf dord) — but what's clear is that neologisms have been adding up. According to the Global Language Monitor: "At the current pace of a new English-language word created about every 98 minutes, English will cross the Million Word Mark on June 10th, 2009, at 10:22 a.m. (Stratford-on Avon Time)." That joyful milestone cannot be reached without the ordinary language enthusiast pitching in. So go ahead, lexicovate! Neologize! Make the world wordful!
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Tue Jun 09, 2009 12:09 pm


    Michael J. Fox
    One of the most famous of Canada's native-son actors is TV and film star Michael J. Fox, who turns 48 today. Ever seeing the bright side of life — he has published two autobiographical books, Lucky Man and Always Looking Up: Observations of an Incurable Optimist — after Fox was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease, he opted to use his celebrity status to campaign for funding to fight the disease. The Michael J. Fox Foundation has become the largest private contributor of money allocated to finding a cure for PD. His illness hasn't affected Fox's sense of humor: participating in the Principal Charity Classicpro-am game last month, a reporter asked him what fans should expect. Fox's reply: "They should wear helmets."
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Mon Jun 08, 2009 12:46 pm


    The Arctic Ocean View Poster
    At a time when we worry about global warming, pollution of our planet, the diminishing number of many species of animals, birds and fish, and the dwindling untouched areas, it is appropriate to think about the world's oceans — the benefits we derive from them and how we can protect them and keep them clean. The world's oceans regulate the climate and generate most of the oxygen we breathe. They help feed us and medicate us. We spend untold hours contemplating the waves, relaxing and being inspired by them. We celebrate the oceans today on World Ocean Day. Aquariums, zoos, museums, schools, and environmental organizations will be sponsoring events and activities designed to teach us how to protect and conserve the World Ocean.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:34 am


    Counting Toes View Poster
    When a baby is born, the doctors do more than count all the fingers and toes. The Apgar Score rates the baby's heart rate, respiration, muscle tone, skin color, and response to stimuli immediately after birth and five minutes later. The system was developed in 1952 by Dr. Virginia Apgar, who was born exactly a century ago today. Dr. Apgar was interested in assessing the baby's well-being right after birth, before the child was whisked away to the nursery. This way, if there was a need, the child could receive immediate medical attention. In her studies, Dr. Apgar also determined that anesthetics given to women during childbirth can have a negative impact on the newborn. This led to a rethinking of the kinds of painkillers women should receive while in the throes of labor.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Sat Jun 06, 2009 2:13 am


    At the Drive-In View Poster

    The first drive-in movie theater opened in Camden, NJ, on this date in 1933. Essentially an open field with a large screen, the audience would drive into the "theater," park next to a post which had a speaker attached to it, and view the movie from the car. Drive-ins were especially popular with parents who didn't want to have to pay extra money for a babysitter; it was common to see whole families in their cars, with the kids in pajamas, watching the movie together. In fact, Richard Hollingshead, who created the first drive-in, advertised it by saying, "The whole family is welcome, regardless of how noisy the children are." That original drive-in theater lasted for three years, but by then, the idea was off and running, and in its heyday, some 4,000 drive-in theaters were scattered across the US.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Fri Jun 05, 2009 11:26 am



    Taking Home the Stanley Cup View Poster
    In 1892, then-governor of Canada, Lord Stanley of Preston, bought a silver bowl and donated it to the Amateur Hockey Association as the prize in a competition. The next year, the Montreal Amateur Athletic AssociationStanley Cup championship. Until 1910, amateur teams played for the coveted prize; then the National Hockey AssociationNHL) took possession of the cup and professional hockey teams began competing for it each year since. Lord Stanley specified that the name of the winning team and the year be inscribed on the cup. It was also decided to inscribe the names of the players on the winning teams. The cup holds more than 2,200 names now, and every 13 years, a new ring is added to the bottom to accommodate the additional names. We're in the midst of this year's Stanley Cup Finals, with the Pittsburgh Penguins up against the Detroit Red Wings.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Thu Jun 04, 2009 4:49 pm


    Playing Cricket View Poster
    The first cricket match between Oxford University and Cambridge University took place at the Lord's Cricket Ground in London on this date in 1827. Though the game has been traced back to the 13th century in England, the first official set of rules to govern the game were only framed in the late 18th century, by the Marylebone Cricket Club. It became so popular, that cricket was named England's official national sport. In 1909, the International Cricket Council was formed to organize and run major international tournaments. The ICC is headquartered in Dubai and consists of 104 member countries.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:55 am


    Looking Up At a Sea Turtle View Poster
    Thirty years ago today, the Mexican oil company Pemex was drilling an oil well named Ixtoc 1 off the Gulf of Mexico when the drill accidentally penetrated an area of high pressure gas. This blowout released 140 million gallons of oil into the surrounding waters, resulting in one of the worst oil spills in history. Among the affected areas was a nesting site for Kemp's Ridley sea turtles. Although often considered protected by fortresses of bone and shell, sea turtles are actually very sensitive to pollutants. Being indiscriminate predators, they will hunt and feed in toxic conditions. Of particular concern is the effect of oil on eggs, hatchlings and juvenile turtles. The Mexican and US fisheries departments joined forces in a rescue and rehabilitation mission. Some 9,000 turtles and hatchlings were airlifted to protected lagoons and held there until water conditions had improved.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Tue Jun 02, 2009 2:01 pm


    The Clevelands
    Grover, Frances and Baby Ruth
    Grover Cleveland became the first — and, so far, only — president to be married in the White House when he and Frances Folsom wed on this date in 1886. Cleveland was 49 and Folsom 21 at the time. Folsom was the daughter of Cleveland's former law partner; when his friend died, Cleveland remained close with the Folsom family and corresponded with Frances when she reached adulthood. The Clevelands' first child (of 5) was named Ruth and was said to be the inspiration for the name of the Baby Ruth candy bar. Though his wedding was not held in the White House, John Tyler was the first president to marry while in office. Tyler also holds the record as the POTUS with the most children — 15
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Mon Jun 01, 2009 7:24 pm


    The 'Chesapeake' and the 'Shannon' View Poster
    During the War of 1812 Captain James Lawrence, recently promoted to captain, was given command of the USS Chesapeake. The frigate, stationed off the coast of Boston, set out to sea on this date in 1813. The British ship Shannon, which was blockading Boston's port, challenged the Chesapeake. The British ship's crew was more experienced and more disciplined; in less than 30 minutes, the[i] Chesapeake surrendered. Lawrence was mortally wounded during the battle, and as he was carried below decks, he called out, "Don't give up the ship!" Captain Oliver Hazard Perry adopted the rallying cry for his own battle flag in the Battle of Lake Erie — a battle in which he was victorious — and the slogan went on to become a motto for the US Navy.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Sun May 31, 2009 10:44 am


    Corn Flakes View Poster
    What are you having for breakfast today? John H. Kellogg changed the world's answer to that question when he filed for a patent for his newly invented wheat-and-grain-flaked cereal on this date in 1895. For centuries, grains and cereals had been ground and soaked and made into a porridge. Kellogg and his brother Willfind a healthier food for patients staying in John's Battle Creek Sanitarium. When the Kellogg brothers tried to press some stale wheat into a dough, it broke off into flakes. They toasted the flakes and served them to their patients, who liked the crunchy taste. The Kellogg brothers used the experimented with different grains, trying to process to create wheat flakes, the first of their marketed products.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Fri May 29, 2009 10:03 am


    Patrick Henry
    With the words "Give me liberty, or give me death!" Patrick Henry secured his place in the collective American heart and memory. A fiery orator, Henry — born on this date in 1736 — was an outspoken critic of British attempts to rule the Thirteen Colonies and a leader of the opposition to the Stamp Act of 1765. Although in his later years he became a Federalist, as Virginia's first governor, Henry opposed the power that the US Constitution gave to the federal government, and was a fierce proponent of the Constitution's Bill of Rights.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Thu May 28, 2009 8:12 pm


    The Returning Hero, Miss Baker View Poster
    Monkeys in Space. In the early days of the space program, in order to protect human lives, animals made the first voyages out of the Earth's atmosphere. In 1948, a rhesus monkey named Albert became the first primate launched. He didn't make it quite into space, as his rocket failed to travel beyond the 100 km Kármán line demarcating the beginning of space. Albert suffocated during the flight. Eleven years later, on May 28, 1959, rhesus monkey Able and squirrel monkey Miss Baker became the first living beings to successfully return to Earth from a journey into space. Able died four days later from a reaction to the anesthesia he received during surgery to remove an infected medical electrode. He was preserved and is on display at the National Air and Space Museum. Miss Baker was 27 years old when she died in 1984. She is buried on the grounds of the US Space and Rocket Center.
    avatar
    Lily
    Admin

    Female
    Number of posts : 776
    Age : 41
    Location : Montreal/Canada
    Job/hobbies : University Teacher / Phd Student /Fitness Coach
    Humor : Optimist
    Registration date : 2009-03-03

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Lily on Wed May 27, 2009 6:32 am


    Adam West as Batman
    With the popularity of Superman comics in 1938, could a superhero friend be far behind? On this date in 1939, Batman made his debut in Detective Comics #27. The only superhero without actual superhuman powers, Batman (aka Bruce Wayne) set out to protect Gotham City from the forces of evil. Created by cartoonist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger, Batman became an instant hit and DC Comics gave him his own comic book Robin (aka Dick Grayson), was introduced to help the caped crusader fight the bad guys in Crime Alley. Grayson moved on to his own comic book series, Nightwing, in the early 80s,and since then Robin has had several other aliases.


    Sponsored content

    Re: Spotlight on ..

    Post by Sponsored content


      Current date/time is Wed Dec 19, 2018 5:28 am