Department of English

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A Guide For Creative Thinking

Thu Sep 17, 2009 3:12 am by BHSoft

A Guide For Creative Thinking by Brian Tracy
Einstein once said, “Every child is born a genius.” But the reason why most people do not function at genius levels is because they are not aware of how creative and smart they really are.I call it the “Schwarzenegger effect.” No one would look at a person such as Arnold Schwarzenegger and think how lucky he is to have been born with such …


Africain Literature

Wed Mar 04, 2009 8:15 pm by Lily

Things Fall Apart is a 1959 English-language novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first African novels written in English to receive global critical acclaim. The title of the novel comes from [url=http://www.answers.com/topic/william-butler-yeats-3]


Algeria's Newspapers ...

Wed Mar 04, 2009 1:11 pm by Lily

study study study study



http://www.algeria press.com/
http://www.algeria press.com/alkhabar.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elwatan.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/echoroukonline.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elmoudjahid.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/liberte.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/horizons.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/el-massa.htm
[url=http://www.algeria-press.com/ech-chaab.htm]…


Algerian Vote

Thu Apr 09, 2009 12:39 pm by Lily

Algerians are voting in a presidential election which opposition groups have described as a charade.












American English

Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:00 pm by Maria

Going to is pronounced GONNA when it is used to show the future. But it is never reduced when it means going from one place to another.

We're going to grab a bite to eat. = We're gonna grab a bite to eat.
I'm going to the office tonight. = I'm going to the office tonight.

2. Want to and want a are both pronounced WANNA and wants to is pronounced WANSTA. Do you want to can also be reduced …

American Slangs

Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:54 pm by Maria

airhead: stupid person.
"Believe it or not, Dave can sometimes act like an airhead!"

amigo: friend (from Spanish).
"I met many amigos at Dave's ESL Cafe."

ammunition: toilet paper.
"Help! We're completely out of ammunition!"

antifreeze: alcohol.
"I'm going to need a lot of antifreeze tonight!"

armpit: dirty, unappealing place.


An Introduction to the British Civilization

Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:54 am by Maria

University of Batna First Year
English Department G: 6-7-8-9
General Culture

[center]An Introduction to the British Civilization

*The United Kingdom :

Full Name : The UK's full and official name is the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".

Location: The United Kingdom (UK) of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country …

Announcements and News

Thu Mar 05, 2009 2:55 am by Lily


"Dear students , we would like to inform you that , from now on , your marks can be consulted through your Website ...Let's surf ! bounce bounce Wink

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

Sun Apr 12, 2009 11:32 pm by Lily

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

The process of applying for a research studentship begins with the identification of a potential supervisor. If you already know a staffmember who is willing to work with you to develop a research proposal,please start by contacting them. If you do not have a supervisor inmind already, …



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    Post by Lily on Fri May 01, 2009 1:40 pm


    Nolan Ryan Pitches View Poster
    Baseball season is in full swing. The Mets and the Yankees are both in new ballparks this season — the Mets playing in Citi Field, and the Yankees in their newly rebuilt Yankee Stadium. Major league baseball had a red-letter day on this date in 1991: Rickey Henderson of the Oakland Athletics stole his 939th base,making him the all-time leader in stolen bases. And, later that evening, Nolan Ryan of the Texas Rangers pitched his seventh career no-hitter, breaking his own record. Neither record has yet been broken. Henderson's records include his career total of 1,406 stolen bases, 2,295 career runs, 81 career lead-off home runs and 130 stolen bases in a single season. The ten-time All-Star will be inducted into the MLB Hall of Fame in July. Nolan Ryan retired at the age of 46 after a record 27 seasons, having struck out 5,714 batters in his career — another record.
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    Post by Lily on Thu Apr 30, 2009 1:15 pm


    NY World's Fair View Poster
    The pencil sharpener, television, FM radio, fluorescent light and the typewriter were just a few of the new inventions introduced to the public at the NY World's Fair, which opened on this date in 1939. With the theme "World of Tomorrow," the fair attracted large crowds to the pavilions in Flushing Meadows Park, Queens. They were looking to science and technology to provide the new post-Depression prosperity everyone hoped for. One of the most popular pavilions housed the General Motors Futurama exhibit designed by Norman Bel Geddes. Franklin D. Roosevelt became the first US president to appear on TV when NBC began its regular broadcasting with live coverage of the Fair; the signal was transmitted from the Empire State Building. Later, Walt Disney based his vision of Disneyland on the 1939 NY World's Fair.
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    Post by Lily on Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:45 am


    There's More Than One Way
    To Say Happiness View Poster
    Outstanding! Remarkable! Extraordinary! Striking! Exceptional! Singular! On this date in 1852, Peter Mark Roget, a British physician (doctor) and philologist(lexicographer), published his thesaurus. But this was only the last in a long line of his achievements (accomplishments). Earlier in life, he invented (devised) a forerunner (precursor) of the slide rule. He studied medicine in Edinburgh, practiced it in Manchester, taught it in London, and served as secretary of the Royal Society. But it was his six-section thesaurus — from the ancient Greek and Latin word for treasury (storehouse) — that cemented his fame (renown) and provided a family business (enterprise) for his son and grandson.
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    Post by Lily on Tue Apr 28, 2009 3:30 pm


    Mutiny on the Bounty
    Mutiny on the Bounty: On this date in 1789, most of the crew of the British ship Bounty — led by Fletcher Christian — mutinied, setting the ship's captain William Bligh and 18 loyal sailors adrift in an open launch in the South Pacific. It took 47 days for the boat to travel the 3,618 nautical miles (6,710 km) to Timor in the Dutch East Indies; the crew had no navigational instruments other than a sextant and a pocket watch. Bligh and his crew returned to Britain in March 1790, and reported the mutiny. Three of the mutineers were later tried, convicted and hanged. Bligh went to trial for losing his ship, and was acquitted.
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    Post by Lily on Sun Apr 26, 2009 12:21 pm


    Gulls in Flight View Poster
    The hobby of bird watching only began to become popular in the early 1900s, with the development of improved binoculars that could be easily carried. Prior to that, most information about birds could only be gathered by shooting them, to study them up close. The first extensive effort to portray birds in their natural habitat was made by John J. Audubon, a largely self-taught ornithologist who painted nearly 500 bird species and produced them in a book called Birds of America. The National Audubon Society was named for the naturalist, who was born on this date in 1785. A product of the Junior Audubon program was Roger Tory Peterson. The young bird lover took to making sketches of distinguishing characteristics of every new bird he encountered. These were eventually published in his A Field Guide to Birds.
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    Post by Lily on Sat Apr 25, 2009 12:31 pm


    Edward R. Murrow View Poster
    Edward R. Murrow, born on this date in 1908, is considered the father obroadcast journalism. He made his mark with his radio broadcasts during World War II, reporting from London's rooftops as bombs were dropped during the battle of Britain. Murrow was with the American troops when they liberated theBuchenwald concentration camp in April 1945. He was so horrified by the sight that greeted him that it took several days before he could make his report, saying, "I have reported what I saw and heard [at Buchenwald], but only part of it. For most of it I have no words. If I've offended you by this rather mild account of Buchenwald, I'm not in the least sorry." After the war, Murrow's See it Nowissues of the day; it became most famous for his criticism of Senator Joseph McCarthy, which helped bring an end to the Red Scare
    series tackled controversial of the 1950s.
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    Post by Lily on Fri Apr 24, 2009 10:47 am


    Turn Off the TV View Poster
    Read a book. Do a crossword puzzle. Play an hours-long game of Monopoly. Plant a vegetable garden. Take a walk. Have a chat with your mom or dad. Sight-see. Put the pictures into the photo albums. Start to tackle the list of projects that has been getting longer. Take a child to the zoo. Write a letter, put it in an envelope and send it through the post office. Cook a gourmet dinner. Help your daughter with her homework. Get into a pickup game of basketball. Repaint your living room. Give your dog a bath. It's National TV Turnoff Week, April 20-26. Also referred to as Mental Detox Week, it's a good excuse to turn off the TV, the computer and all the other digital toys that keep us inside and focused on a screen.
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    Post by Lily on Thu Apr 23, 2009 1:45 pm


    William Shakespeare View Poster
    Most literary critics agree that William Shakespeare was the greatest playwright in the English language. Playwright Ben Jonson said of him, "Shakespeare was not of an age, but for all time." And, indeed, his work — produced during the Elizabethan era — is as popular and vibrant 400 years later. The "Bard of Avon" was equally successful writing poetry and plays, comedy and tragedy. He published over 150 sonnets and dozens of plays, among them Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet and Macbeth. Shakespeare is believed to have been born on April 23, 1564, and died exactly 52 years later, on April 23, 1616.

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    Post by Lily on Wed Apr 22, 2009 11:11 am


    Planet Earth View Poster
    Today is Earth Day, a day when some 140 nations celebrate the environment. Activities include street fairs, television programs, lectures, and exhibits focusing on issues like global warming,deforestation, and pollution of our soil, water and air. Though the original Earth Day was proposed for March 21 — the date of the vernal equinox — on April 22, 1970, US SenatorGaylord Nelson sponsored a nationwide event that evolved into the current annual international celebration. This year's theme, The Green Generation, will mark the start of a two-year campaign to encourage people to use alternate energy sources, develop new technologies and teach effective ways of preserving the planet.
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    Post by Lily on Tue Apr 21, 2009 9:42 pm


    Rome's Forum and Colliseum View Poster
    According to tradition, Rome, the Eternal City, was founded on this date in 753 BCE. Legend has it that twins Romulus and Remus were born to the mythical god Mars and the priestess Rhea Silvia.Though abandoned by their parents as babies, the two were allegedly found and raised on Palatine Hill. They grew up strong and handsome, and decided to found a city; Romulus determined it should be located at the site where they were found, and the city was named for him. Remus became envious of Romulus, provoking Romulus to slay his twin brother.
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    Miro's 'The Singer' View Poster
    Abstract painter and sculptor Joan Miró was born on this date in 1893. A practitioner of surrealist automatism, Miró did not call himself a surrealist; this allowed him to experiment freely with different media. Miró's use of vivid primary colors, delicate lines and abstract shapes make his pieces very easy to identify. He created collages and tapestries, painted murals for hotels in New York and Cincinnati, and created ceramic decorations for the UNESCO buildings in Paris. Many of Miró's pieces hang in the Museum of Modern Art and the Guggenheim Museum in New York City.
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    Post by Lily on Sun Apr 19, 2009 10:10 pm


    Minutemen Off to Battle View Poster

    Tensions were high on this date in 1775, as British troops approached Lexington, MA. The conflict between Britain and its American colonies was intensifying, and the redcoats were en route to seize arms purportedly stockpiled in nearby Concord. Some 70 minutemen waited on the green in Lexington, and as the British came near, a shot was fired. It is still not clear who fired that first shot heard round the world, but it is called the shot that began the American Revolution. The nervous redcoats, believing themselves under attack, immediately fired back, killing eight of the colonists. By the time they had pushed on to Concord, the arms had been removed and approximately 300 militiamen were there to meet them. The British were forced to retreat to Boston. In the end, some 270 British and 95 Americans were killed that day in what became known as the Battles of Lexington and Concord.
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    Post by Lily on Sat Apr 18, 2009 10:28 am


    Blarney Castle
    in Ireland View Poster
    Éire formally withdrew from the British Commonwealth and became the Republic of Ireland sixty years ago today. Europe's third largest island, Ireland was controlled by Great Britain — the island located east of Ireland — for many centuries, finally becoming a part of the United Kingdom in 1801. In 1922, after a War of Independence, Ireland was split into two: the Irish Free State, which would have dominion status in the Commonwealth, and Northern Ireland, which chose to rejoin the United Kingdom. Fifteen years later, in 1937, the nation took the next step in its independence declaring itself the sovereign state of Éire.
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    Post by Lily on Fri Apr 17, 2009 2:04 pm


    The Evolving Mustang View Poster
    The Ford Motor Company unveiled its new car, the Mustang, 45 years ago today, at the New York World's Fair. The first of the "pony cars," the Mustang was a runaway hit. Though the Ford company only expected to sell about 100,000 cars in the first year, six times that many were sold that model year and it had already made its movie debut in Goldfinger. Agents took orders for 22,000 cars on its premier day, with a ticket price of $2,368. The Mustang was the first car ever to win the Tiffany Gold Medal for Excellence in American Design; it went on to win many other awards and was named five times to the Car and Driver Ten Best list.
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    Post by Lily on Thu Apr 16, 2009 12:43 pm


    Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

    Happy 62nd birthday to basketball giant Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Famous for his skyhook and dunk shot, Abdul-Jabbar so dominated the center court when he played for UCLA that the NCAA finally outlawed dunking. Abdul-Jabbar still holds the NBA record for leading scorer with 38,387 points, and he is the only player to be named NCAA Basketball Tournament's Most Outstanding Player three times (1967-69). In 1994, President Bill Clinton named Abdul-Jabbar one of "The Great Ones" in the first National Sports Awards, along with Muhammad Ali, Arnold Palmer, Wilma Rudolph and Ted Williams.
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    Post by Lily on Wed Apr 15, 2009 4:02 pm


    Tax Day View Poster
    In America, today — April 15 — is Tax Day, the deadline date for filing income tax reports. According to the IRS's1040 form, the average individual spends upwards of 14 hours and $114 preparing his tax return. Businesses spend more: it takes them, on average, 57 hours, costing $447 to prepare their more complicated forms. More returns are now being filed electronically; those earning less than $56,000 a year can file for free using the Internet, and refunds often arrive within 10 days to those who set up a direct deposit payment. Note: the IRS does NOT send out emails; any emails received with an IRS return address are spam and should be deleted.
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    Post by Lily on Tue Apr 14, 2009 3:30 pm


    'Titanic' Ad View Poster
    It had taken three years to build the RMS Titanic, and at the time of her journey, she was the largest ship on the seas. The luxury liner was billed as being "unsinkable," so sinking was the last thing on the minds of the more than 2,200 passengers and crew members who set sail on her maiden journey, on April 10, 1912. Many were asleep when she hit an iceberg four days later, at 11:40 PM. A little more than two hours after that, the boat sank. More than 1,500 died in the disaster, most of them having frozen in the frigid waters. One of the survivors, crew member Violet Jessop, had been on board when the Titanic's sister ship, RMS Olympic, collided with the HMS Hawke in 1911, and she went on to survive the sinking of the third ship in the trio, the HMHS Britannic in 1916.

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    Post by Lily on Mon Apr 13, 2009 7:32 pm

    Aristotle once called the elephant "the beast which passeth all others in wit and mind." They're the largest living land mammals, naturally found in the tropical regions of Africa and Asia. Such a large animal needs plenty of food — the average elephant eats around 500 lbs (225 kg) of vegetation and drinks up to 50 gal (190 l) of water every day. As Aristotle pointed out, though, one of the most appealing things about elephants is their intelligence. They have been trained to do all kinds of tricks, and a few elephants became famous for their artwork. One elephant, Ruby, had a painting sold for $100,000. The word "jumbo" was inspired by Jumbo, one of history's largest circus elephants. It is thought to be a derivative of the Swahili word "jambe," meaning "chief." On this date in 1796, the first elephant arrived in the United States, brought from Bengal.

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    Post by Lily on Sun Apr 12, 2009 2:01 pm


    Bill Haley and His Comets

    Fifty-five years ago today, Bill Haley and His Comets recorded "Rock Around the Clock." Though the group's "Shake, Rattle and Roll" was a bigger hit when it was first released, "Rock Around the Clock" was the song that went down in history as the one that ushered in the era of rock 'n' roll. The song didn't take off at first. Several months later, though, it was used in the film The Blackboard Jungle, playing over the credits, and it was rereleased as a single. This time it was a hit, holding the
    No. 1 spot in the American Billboard charts for eight weeks; it was also the first single to sell over a million copies in both Britain and Germany.


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    Post by Lily on Thu Apr 09, 2009 10:49 am


    American Passport
    Marquis de Lafayette, Winston Churchill, Raoul Wallenberg,William and Hannah Callowhill Penn and Mother Theresa: these six, all of whom were born outside the United States, have been grantedhonorary citizenship of the US, because of their meritorious actions. Churchill was the first to be honored this way, on this date in 1963. A seventh candidate, Kazimierz Pułaski, was approved by the Senate and is awaiting approval by the House of Representatives and the President's signature. Recipients don't get an official American passport and they are not subject to US taxes.
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    Post by Lily on Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:45 am


    With America's economy in the doldrums and unemployment rising,many people have suggested that it may be time for President Obama to resurrect the WPA — Works Projects Administration. A program designed to put Americans back to work, it employed hundreds of thousands of semi-skilled and unskilled laborers, not to mention writers, artists and performers. Bridges, parks, roads and public buildings were built; sculptures, murals and paintings were produced and art galleries were opened. On this date in 1835, Congress authorized a $4.8-billion expenditure by the US federal government, the most expensive and wide-spread relief program in American history.
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    Post by Lily on Tue Apr 07, 2009 11:02 am


    Billie Holiday View Poster
    Billie Holiday — one of the jazz world's greatest names — never even learned to read music. But, she loved jazz and cut her teeth on singing along with Bessie Smith or Louis Armstrong records in afterhours clubs in Baltimore. Holiday moved to NY with her mother in the 1930s; she sang in Harlem nightclubs, where she was spotted by John Hammond, who was responsible for her first big break: cutting a record as part of a group of singers led by Benny Goodman. With a trademark white gardenia in her hair, "Lady Day" (as she was known) sang songs like "The Man I Love," "Porgy," "Strange Fruit" and "God Bless the Child." Billie Holiday was born on this date in 1915.
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    Post by Lily on Mon Apr 06, 2009 6:40 pm



    North Pole View Poster
    One hundred years ago today, American explorer Robert Peary, his assistant Matthew Henson, and four Inuit guides became the first recorded people to reach the North Pole. In his book, The North Pole, Perry listed some of the provisions his group took on their excursion: 16,000 pounds of flour, 1,000 pounds of coffee, 800 pounds of tea, 10,000 pounds of sugar, 7,000 pounds of bacon, 10,000 pounds of biscuits, 100 cases of condensed milk, 30,000 pounds of pemmican, 1,000 pounds of tobacco and about 300 tons of coal. Some 246 dogs helped to pull the sledges across the Polar Sea. A 1996 analysis of a newly-discovered copy of Peary's records indicated that Peary was actually 20 nautical miles (40 km) short of the magnetic North Pole.

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    Post by Lily on Sun Apr 05, 2009 5:21 pm


    Sign Language
    Sign language is not just for the hearing-impaired. Communities of people such as Australian AboriginesPlains Indians have richly developed languages, based on hand and body gestures. Since these languages are based more on concepts than specific words, they often have more in common with each other than do spoken languages. The first sign language for the deaf was developed by Charles-Michel de l'Épée in 1700s France. Thomas Gallaudet brought the language — which evolved into ASLUS in 1816. On this date in 1887, Anne Sullivan used manual communication to successfully communicate the word "water" to Helen Keller.


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    Post by Lily on Sat Apr 04, 2009 12:36 pm


    Gazing at the Sky View Poster
    It's been 400 years since Galileo Galilei began to stargaze with the high-powered astronomical telescope that he invented, thus opening the sky to greater research and scientific discovery. The UN has declared this year the International Year of Astronomy, to celebrate astronomy's impact on science and culture. One of the cornerstone projects of the year began on April 2 and will conclude tomorrow — 100 Hours of Astronomy, with one of the key goals of the four-day event being to have as many people as possible look through a telescope as Galileo first did in 1609. Today is also the opening day of Yuri's Night, a global celebration of all that has been achieved in space. Traditionally held on April 12th, the anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's first manned space launch, this year's expanded festivities are scheduled from today through April 12th.

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