Department of English

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A Guide For Creative Thinking

Thu Sep 17, 2009 3:12 am by BHSoft

A Guide For Creative Thinking by Brian Tracy
Einstein once said, “Every child is born a genius.” But the reason why most people do not function at genius levels is because they are not aware of how creative and smart they really are.I call it the “Schwarzenegger effect.” No one would look at a person such as Arnold Schwarzenegger and think how lucky he is to have been born with such …


Africain Literature

Wed Mar 04, 2009 8:15 pm by Lily

Things Fall Apart is a 1959 English-language novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first African novels written in English to receive global critical acclaim. The title of the novel comes from [url=http://www.answers.com/topic/william-butler-yeats-3]


Algeria's Newspapers ...

Wed Mar 04, 2009 1:11 pm by Lily

study study study study



http://www.algeria press.com/
http://www.algeria press.com/alkhabar.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elwatan.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/echoroukonline.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elmoudjahid.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/liberte.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/horizons.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/el-massa.htm
[url=http://www.algeria-press.com/ech-chaab.htm]…


Algerian Vote

Thu Apr 09, 2009 12:39 pm by Lily

Algerians are voting in a presidential election which opposition groups have described as a charade.












American English

Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:00 pm by Maria

Going to is pronounced GONNA when it is used to show the future. But it is never reduced when it means going from one place to another.

We're going to grab a bite to eat. = We're gonna grab a bite to eat.
I'm going to the office tonight. = I'm going to the office tonight.

2. Want to and want a are both pronounced WANNA and wants to is pronounced WANSTA. Do you want to can also be reduced …

American Slangs

Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:54 pm by Maria

airhead: stupid person.
"Believe it or not, Dave can sometimes act like an airhead!"

amigo: friend (from Spanish).
"I met many amigos at Dave's ESL Cafe."

ammunition: toilet paper.
"Help! We're completely out of ammunition!"

antifreeze: alcohol.
"I'm going to need a lot of antifreeze tonight!"

armpit: dirty, unappealing place.


An Introduction to the British Civilization

Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:54 am by Maria

University of Batna First Year
English Department G: 6-7-8-9
General Culture

[center]An Introduction to the British Civilization

*The United Kingdom :

Full Name : The UK's full and official name is the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".

Location: The United Kingdom (UK) of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country …

Announcements and News

Thu Mar 05, 2009 2:55 am by Lily


"Dear students , we would like to inform you that , from now on , your marks can be consulted through your Website ...Let's surf ! bounce bounce Wink

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

Sun Apr 12, 2009 11:32 pm by Lily

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

The process of applying for a research studentship begins with the identification of a potential supervisor. If you already know a staffmember who is willing to work with you to develop a research proposal,please start by contacting them. If you do not have a supervisor inmind already, …



    Word of the day

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    Word of the Day:Peregrination

    Post by Lily on Sat Jun 13, 2009 10:56 am

    Peregrination(noun)
    Pronunciation: [pe-rê-gri-'ney-shên]
    Definition:A long, meandering journey or walk; a course of travel.
    Usage: Because it implies travel over a long period of time to various places, today's word is often used in the plural: "His European peregrinations left Dirk physically exhausted and speaking with an undeterminable accent." This noun is derived from the verb "peregrinate" which is based on the adjective peregrine "foreign; migratory, traveling.
    Suggested Usage: Today's word implies long, drawn-out travels, "Randall's late night peregrinations always ended at Melody's door, where he could never bring himself to ring the bell." The verb works just as well, "Why is Fosdick peregrinating around Europe when he is needed here?
    Etymology: French "peregrination" based on Latin peregrinus "foreign, strange," itself from pereger "abroad, away" from per "through, beyond" + ager "land, field," also found in "agriculture." English "acre" derives from the same source as "ager." English "for, fore-, forth, and first" derive from the same source as Latin "per-" as does the Russian prefix pere- found in perestroika "rebuilding.
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    Word of the day :Goer

    Post by Lily on Fri Jun 12, 2009 12:20 pm

    Goer(noun)
    Pronunciation: ['go-wêr]
    Definition: Something that goes, works, or gets things done, a person that is going places and who really makes things happen, a promising project or anything that is really successful but—a promiscuous young woman.
    Usage: A plan is a "goer" if it shows promise of working. "Where Ozzies would say "It's a goer," folks in the US would probably say "It's a winner."
    Suggested Usage: Here again we have a word that tells us about masculine domination of the language. "He is a real goer" refers to a very capable man with a lot on the ball while "She is a real goer" suggests a woman who moves too fast and in the wrong lane. (Women were supposed to stay at home.) But today's word applies to everything in the world: "No, Ozzie, while it is innovative, I don't think your broccoli ice cream is a goer."
    Etymology: Today's word is derived from the verb "go" from Old English "gan." The verb is prevalent among Germanic languages, e.g. Swedish "går," German "gehen," Dutch "gaan," but is found in few other Indo-European languages. It is suspected in Latin heres "heir" with a suffix -r (*ghe-re-) and in Greek khoros "place," which would put it in the English borrowings "hereditary" and "choreography." But both etymologies are stretches. The past tense, "went," is the old participle of wend "to wind one's way." Another variant of "go" is "gang," still used in Scotland, as in Bobby Burns' famous proverb, "The best laid schemes o' Mice an' Men, gang aft agley." Elsewhere its meaning changed to "going, way of going" and vanished except in compounds like "gang-plank."
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    Re: Word of the day

    Post by Lily on Thu Jun 11, 2009 9:40 pm

    Desiccate(verb)
    Pronunciation: ['de-sê-keyt]
    Definition: (1) To dry; to preserve a food by drying; (2) To deplete of emotional or intellectual resources. The adjective, desiccate ['des-i-kêt] means "without spirit or vitality.
    Usage: (2) The British slang word "knackered" is synonymous with the second definition, but this word is of a much higher register. "After the long bitter campaign, the candidates emerged two desiccate souls in dire need of vacation."
    Suggested Usage: Basically, the word means "dried up." "Cleaning out Josh's closet, his mother found six single socks, an unfamiliar mitten, her husband's driver's license, a list of what seemed to be passwords to several State Department computer accounts, and an assortment of desiccated fruits and meats." Metaphorically, the word may be extended to the human psyche: "Finals week and questionable study habits desiccated many students by the end of the semester."
    Etymology: Latin desiccare derived from de- + siccare "to dry up" (from siccus "dry").
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    Word of the Day:Allege

    Post by Lily on Tue Jun 09, 2009 2:38 pm

    Allege:verb
    Definition: To assert as true; to assert without providing proof.
    Usage: oday's is the magic word that allows the US news media to jump to damaging conclusions without fear of legal reprisal. The past participle, "alleged," is used so much more frequently than the verb that it has become an adjective unto itself meaning,"accused without proof." Even with this innovation, however, the word is often misused, especially in the media. While Nick Dalolli might be an alleged burglar, he did not commit an alleged burglary—the burglary must be conclusively proven if Nick is a suspect. The adverb "allegedly" never works. "Gertrude allegedly trained the suicide newts" does not mean that Gertrude trained the newts in an alleged manner but "It is alleged that Gertrude trained the newts." So that is what you should say. The noun, of course, is "allegation.
    Suggested Usage: If you wish to be an absolute purist, avoid the rather idiomatic adjective itself in favor of semantically more precise terms like "purported" or "suspected" and use the verb only as a verb. Here is an example: "The suspected perpetrator of what police allege to be a crime has been suspended from the force pending further investigation." At least, we should use the verb more than the adjective in order to establish its meaning clearly in our speech: "Buffy alleged that her brother pulled her hair in the back seat of the car." This contrasts with Buffy's providing conclusive evidence of the act, such as a small bald spot on her head.
    Etymology: Middle English "alleggen" from Old French alegier "to vindicate, justify." The history of today's word is interesting because the form of the word derives from Latin allegare but the meaning comes from from esligier "to pay a fine, justify oneself" from Late Latin *exlitigare "to legally clear" from ex "out (of)" + litigare "to sue." "Allegare" went on through French to become English "allay." Apparently the two were confused at some point and the prefix ex- was replaced by ad- (an-, am-, al-, ar-).
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    Word of the day:Remorse

    Post by Lily on Sun Jun 07, 2009 9:56 pm

    Remorse(noun)
    Pronunciation: [ri-'mors]
    Definition: A deep, prolonged regret for wrong-doing whose damage cannot be repaired.
    Usage:Today's word has several near synonyms. "Regret" is a plain sense of sorrow for offensive or immoral behavior. "Penitence" is a sincere admission of transgression with an implication that the penitent intends to undertake moral improvement. "Contrition" is an absolute relinquishment of self to complete and perfect penitence for misdeeds. "Compunction" is a simple pang of conscience for a contemplated action of questionable morality. The adjective from today's word is "remorseful."
    Suggested Usage: Ogden Nash thought remorse "a violent dyspepsia of the mind" but added, "One man’s remorse is another man’s reminiscence." However, there is too little evidence of it in contemporary society, perhaps the fact that led Tom Clancy to write the book, 'Without Remorse.' We have a growing list of real and fictional heroes who resort to violence without any remorse for the consequences. This leaves me a bit remorseful myself.
    Etymology: From the Latin verb remordere "to bite again," which gives us some insight into the original Roman torture, since it later came to mean "to torment." The past participle of this verb is "remorsus," which made it to Old French as "remors" (currently "remords") whence we nicked it. "Morsel" (a small piece of food; a bite) comes from the same Latin verb, mordere "to bite.
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    Word of the day:Concatenate

    Post by Lily on Sat Jun 06, 2009 3:21 pm

    Concatenate(verb)
    Definition: To link together, as in a chain.
    Usage: The adjective means "to be linked together" and is pronounced [kên-'kæt-ê-nêt]. The noun is concatenation."
    Suggested Usage: Let's throw the phrase "surfing the Web" into a higher register (if not out altogether): "I'm making a concatenate series of informative stops on the Web, not browsing!" Or make your colleagues scramble for their YD look-up button with a oneupsmanship winner like this: "My life has been a concatenation of disasters/triumphs beginning shortly after birth." (Strike the inapplicable noun.) "Bill can't concatenate two words without misusing one but he refuses the help of YourDictionary.com."
    Etymology: Late Latin concatenare, com- "with, together" + catenare "to bind" from Latin catena "chain." "Catena" is also the origin of English "chain," by the way, via French "chaîne.
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    Word of the Day:Attenuate

    Post by Lily on Fri Jun 05, 2009 1:19 pm

    Attenuate(verb)
    Pronunciation: [ê-'ten-yu-weyt]
    Definition: To make thinner—narrower, rarer, or weaker; to reduce in strength, force, effect; to weaken.
    Usage:This verb has fathered a healthy family of related words. The noun is "attenuation" and something that attenuates is an attenuator. There are two adjectives: attenuative means "tending to attenuate" while "attenuate" [ê-'ten-yu-êt] means "thin or having been made thin."
    Suggested Usage: The basic meaning of today's word is to make thinner in girth, "The month of wandering the desert had noticeably attenuated Fatima." This applies to both senses of the word "thin," as we see here: "Finding the kumquat smoothie a bit too thick for her taste, Portia attenuated it with a half cup of gin." The other meaning is to reduce the power or intensity of something, "Boomer, would you mind attenuating the music until I am off the telephone?"
    Etymology: Latin attenuare, attenuat-: ad- "to" + tenuare "to make thin" (from tenuis "thin"). The root *ten- with the suffix -d shows up in many words borrowed from Latin, including tender "to offer," "tendon" (Greek "tenon" from teinein "to stretch"). Greek has a partially reduplicated form with the root repeated: tetanos "rigid" which gave us "tetanus" via Latin. In Latin, the root turns up in tenere "to hold" and from there found its way into tenant "lease holder" and tenor "course or drift of a discourse." As you can see in the pairs Latin pater : English father, Latin mater : English mother, the PIE [t] became [th] in English so we get the expected "thin" from the same root in English.
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    Word of the Day:Steganography

    Post by Lily on Thu Jun 04, 2009 5:05 pm

    Steganography(noun)
    Definition: Hiding writing in plain view, cryptography.
    Usage: This word has been in use since 1569 as a synonym for "cryptography." Recently, however, it has been associated with digital watermarking, so it may diverge from "cryptography" in the future.It comes replete with a panoply of derivatives: "steganogram," "steganographer," and an adjective, "steganographical."
    Suggested Usage:The use of this term in referring to digital watermarking means no one has had time to use it metaphorically: "Any half-clever steganographer can find the watermark in this graphic file." Already we can send steganograms via e-mail to the extent they are merely encrypted messages, but what of concealed codes in missives of all sorts: "Manfred loves to steganographically conceal messages in his letters to Flo."
    Etymology: From Greek steganos "covered" + graphein "to write." "Steganos" comes from stegein "to cover (water-tight)." Domos hala stegon "a house that keeps out the sea" was a metaphor for a good ship. The same root occurs without "s" in Latin tegere "to cover" whence tegula that evolved into "tile." In the Germanic languages this form emerges in German decken "cover," Dach "roof," and "deck" from Middle Dutch dec "roof, covering." In Russian we find stegnut' "to button, zip, etc." and, finally, from Hindi we get "thug" from Hindi "thag," probably from Sanskrit sthaga "a cheat," itself from sthagati "he conceals."
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    Word of the Day :Parsimony

    Post by Lily on Wed Jun 03, 2009 9:12 am

    Parsimony (noun)
    Definition: Today's word has a positive meaning, "frugality, husbandry, or economy," i.e. the judicious employment of resources. It also has a pejorative one, "extreme stinginess."
    Usage: The Law of Parsimony, otherwise known as Ockham's (or Occam's) Razor, is a preference for the simplest explanation (hypothesis) of the largest array of phenomena—Ockham’s Razor cuts off the superfluous. In other words, it is best to explain the most you can in the fewest words. The adjective is "parsimonious" [pah(r)-sê-'mon-i-ês] and the adverb, "parsimoniously."
    Suggested Usage: Today's word usually refers to an excessive frugality: "My husband is so obsessed with parsimony that he won't spend a penny without a discount coupon." However, the philosopher Edmund Burke reminds us to that, "[m]ere parsimony is not economy.... Expense, and great expense, may be an essential part in true economy;" which is to say, keep an eye on the long term.
    Etymology: Middle English "parcimony" from Latin parsimonia "parsimony" based on "parsus," the past participle of parcere "to be sparing." The root is probably related to the Greek word sparnos "rare, uncommon" and English "spare." It is also tied to Latin parvus "small" and paucus "few."
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    Word of the Day:Parsimony

    Post by Lily on Mon Jun 01, 2009 7:13 pm

    Parsimony:noun
    Definition: Today's word has a positive meaning, "frugality, husbandry, or economy," i.e. the judicious employment of resources. It also has a pejorative one, "extreme stinginess."
    Usage: The Law of Parsimony, otherwise known as Ockham's (or Occam's) Razor, is a preference for the simplest explanation (hypothesis) of the largest array of phenomena—Ockham’s Razor cuts off the superfluous. In other words, it is best to explain the most you can in the fewest words. The adjective is "parsimonious" [pah(r)-sê-'mon-i-ês] and the adverb, "parsimoniously."
    Suggested Usage: Today's word usually refers to an excessive frugality: "My husband is so obsessed with parsimony that he won't spend a penny without a discount coupon." However, the philosopher Edmund Burke reminds us to that, "[m]ere parsimony is not economy.... Expense, and great expense, may be an essential part in true economy;" which is to say, keep an eye on the long term.
    Etymology: Middle English "parcimony" from Latin parsimonia "parsimony" based on "parsus," the past participle of parcere "to be sparing." The root is probably related to the Greek word sparnos "rare, uncommon" and English "spare." It is also tied to Latin parvus "small" and paucus "few."
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    Word of the day:Osculate

    Post by Lily on Sun May 31, 2009 2:25 pm

    Osculate(verb)
    Definition: To come together, to contact (as two osculating circles); to kiss.
    Usage: Today's word is for those shy, affectionate people who are willing to talk about kissing in public but not so that other people understand. As you might expect, it comes from a large, happy family with several adjectives, such as osculable "kissable" (such osculable lips), osculant "kissing" (an osculant cousin?), and "osculatory" (an osculatory couple in the shadows). There are two nouns, the expectable osculation "a kiss" and an eccentric osculary "something to be kissed," which might refer to an icon, a rosary, or anything else you find kissable.
    Suggested Usage: We hope you find someone to whom today's word applies in all its lexical splendor: someone you wish to come together with, to contact, and to kiss. Surprise your wife with, "Let's osculate!" for a change of pace. Tell your husband that you are in the mood for a little osculation. It might be good for a giggle and kissing and smiling go together like Valentine's Day and hearts.
    Etymology: In case you hadn't guessed, today's word comes from Latin, specifically the verb osculari "to kiss," based on osculum "kiss" (as osculum pacis "the kiss of peace"). "Osculum is the diminutive of os "mouth." We discussed this root recently in connection with the word "orotund," noting that in Latin it changed to or- in most words, so that it is the same root underlying "oral," "orifice," and "orator.
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    Word of the day:Cavalcade

    Post by Lily on Thu May 28, 2009 10:41 pm

    Cavalcade (noun)
    Definition: (1) A mounted procession of horseback riders, horse-drawn carriages or both; (2) a procession of dignitaries; (3) a planned sequence of remarkable events or people, as a show featuring a cavalcade of stars.
    Usage: "Cavalcade" is one of those words used rather frequently by people who do not have a completely clear idea of its meaning. In 'Australia Visited' (1941), Noel Coward confessed, "I was fortunate to be able to administer a little artificial respiration to the word ‘Cavalcade’. Before I wrote the play of that name, the word had fallen into disuse.... Now...there are...Cavalcades of fashion, Hollywood Cavalcades, ...Cavalcades of practically anything that can be cavalcaded."
    Suggested Usage: Cavalcades of the original sense (a mounted procession) are a rarity today, but you might want to say, "There were several cavalcades of horse-fanciers in the Rose Parade this year." The word is probably overused in the last two meanings: "A veritable cavalcade of corporate executives are passing through the doors of US courts these days."
    Etymology: Today's word was borrowed from French cavalcade, now meaning "stampede," who borrowed it from "cavalcata," the past participle of Old Italian cavalcare "to ride on horseback." The same word in Spanish is "cabalgada." Today's word is related to"cavalry" and "cavalier," which French, for reasons of their own, converted to "chevalerie," which we then borrowed as "chivalry." The Italian word descended normally from Medieval Latin "caballicare" from Latin caballus "horse." This word is related to Black Sea Greek kaballeion "horse-drawn vehicle" and Russian kobyla "mare," and may been borrowed from the ancestor of Finnish hepo "horse." In Classic Greek it turned up as hippos "horse," found in hippopotamus, literally, "river horse."
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    Word of the day:Bastion

    Post by Lily on Tue May 26, 2009 10:22 pm

    Bastion:Noun
    Definition: A projection in the wall of a fortress that commands the walls on either side; any well-fortified position or impregnable stronghold.
    Usage: Today's word is seldom used in reference to fortifications, except in a historical sense. Rather, it is used almost synonymously with bulwark, a thick wall or fortification for defense. A bulwark is essentially a rampart, a defensive wall from which a bastion might jut. A rampart may also be a natural mound, such as the steep bank of a river.
    Suggested Usage: We suggest you use today's word as Shulamith Firestone used it in 'The Bar as Microcosm,' "For centuries [the bar] was the bastion of male privilege, the gathering place for men away from their women...." It refers to a stronghold that also may be a safe refuge: "The beauty parlor of the 1950's was the great bastion of femininity, where women could gather and converse on topics of interest only to them." Today, however, few such bastions remain, as women invade the bars and more men have their hair styled in beauty parlors than cut at the barber's.
    Etymology: Today's is a word borrowed from French but (probably) not from Latin. The word goes back to the Old French noun, "bastillon" (pronounced [bastiyoN]), diminutive of bastille "fortress" and, later, "jail." This word is famous for the important French holiday, "Bastille Day," celebrated July 14, the day the infamous Parisian jail was stormed and emptied, leading to the end of the monarchy and the beginning of the First Republic. The root's history is cloudy but apparently is related to Old Provençal bastir "to build," probably of Germanic origin.
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    Word of the Day :Quibble

    Post by Lily on Sun May 24, 2009 11:23 pm

    Quibble(verb)
    Definition: To raise petty questions, to hesitate or argue over trivial issues, to cavil.
    Usage: People quibble over quibbles (the noun) and those who do so can be quite quibbly (the adjective). Quibbling is the activity carried out by quibbly people when they quibble.
    Suggested Usage: Back in September of 2001 the House of Representatives wasted a considerable amount of time quibbling, according to the media, over whether the defense budget should be $345 billion or $385 billion. Come on, fellows, what is $40 billion between buddies? Quibbling usually has to do with items far smaller than $345 billion: "Driscoll ran up a $100 bar tab, then quibbled with the bartender over a 25-cent item on it. The man is completely gonzo!"
    Etymology: Just as a dribble is a small drip, and a nibble is a small nip, a quibble was originally a small quip in the sense of a petty remark or jibe. "Quibble," then, was a diminutive whose meaning changed as diminutives eroded from English. (The suffix still enjoys this usage in Southern Germany, where a girl is a Mädel (little maid), a Häusel is a little house and little Hans is Hänsel pronounced [hensêl].) From Latin qui, quibus (Dative-Ablative Plural) "who, which," a word often found in legal documents where quibbling is a fine art. "Qui" comes from PIE *kwo- with various endings. In the Germanic languages, the initial [k] regularly became [h], giving us "who," "where" [hwer], "why" [hwI], "whether," among others. In the Slavic languages the *kw reduced to a simple [k], to which accrued various suffixes, resulting in pronouns like kto "who," kogda "when," kuda "where" in Russian and other languages.
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    Word of the Day:Roil

    Post by Lily on Sat May 23, 2009 2:35 pm

    Roil(verb)
    Definition: To stir up the sediment in liquid, to muddy; to stir up the emotions, to anger someone.
    Usage: English-speakers have long struggled with the diphthong [oi]. In Brooklyn and Queens it replaces [êr] today, e.g. "bird" becomes "boid," "third" becomes "toid," and "heard" becomes "hoid." In parts of the South just the opposite movement occurred in various dialects, the diphthong [oi] became
    as in "eye." In these dialects "oil" was pronounced "ile," "point," "pint," "boil," "bile," while "roil" is pronounced "rile." In some British and Australian dialects, just the opposite switch may be observed. The only one of these that made it into mainstream English was "rile," which many US dictionaries now list as a variant pronunciation of "roil." Many US Americans do not even realize the correct pronunciation of this verb is "roil," hence today's selection. There is an adjective roily "turbid, muddy, stirred up."
    Suggested Usage: First, let me get this off my chest: "Nothing roils me more than hearing someone pronounce this verb 'rile.'" It affects me slightly less if they pronounce "point," "pint," and "oil," "ile;" there is at least some dialectal consistency in that. Now, here is a quaint Southernism I just concocted to remind us of the original meaning of today's verb: "Don't roil the water where you may have to drink." It also serves to demonstrate that not all Southerners mispronounce this verb "rile."
    Etymology: The origin of today's word is unknown but it is probably a dialectal variation of "roll." If so (with emphasis on "if"), then the split antedates Middle English when the two were already distinguished: rollen, roulen "roll" and roylen "roil." "Roll" was borrowed from Old French ro(u)ler, devolved from Vulgar Latin *rotulare "roll," based on Latin rotula, the diminutive of rota "wheel." This word family was adopted by English as "rotate," "rotor," "rotund," and "rotunda." Latin rotundus "round," after passing through the wheels of Roman, French, and English history, emerged as English "round," while a variant ended up naming the spiked wheel of a spur, the "rowel."

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    Word of the day:Spendthrift

    Post by Lily on Fri May 22, 2009 2:07 pm

    Spendthrift(noun)
    Definition: A person who spends money wastefully.
    Usage:Today's word is confused too easily with its antonym,"thrifty." To keep in mind the difference, remember that someone who throws money around spends his thrift (see Etymology), and you won't go wrong. "Spendthrift" has a colorful synonym that we don't use nearly enough. It might help you recall the meaning of today's word:"scattergood."
    Suggested Usage: "Ethan was a known spendthrift, but his prodigality was renamed generosity after he ordered twelve subs for the speech team's fund-raiser." And remember the circumstances in which normally thrifty people stop minding their wallets, "Daffine turns into a bit of a spendthrift after her third martini, so go ahead and order the steak."
    Etymology: How did two oxymoronic words, "spend" and "thrift," come together to mean "wastrel?" It has to do with an obsolete definition of "thrift," which today's word protects from obliteration: "accumulated wealth." Now the connection is easy to see. Someone who wastes their savings becomes a spendthrift. "Spend" comes from Middle English "spenden" from Latin expendere "to expend" and is akin to "spin" (hence "spider") and "span." "Thrift" comes from the Middle English thrift "prosperity," based on the verb "thrive.
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    Re: Word of the day

    Post by dahaka on Thu May 21, 2009 11:47 pm

    Department of English
    部の英語の

    Welcome to the Department of English University of Batna 's websi
    ようこそ英語の部にバトナ大学'でウェブサイト秒
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    Re: Word of the day

    Post by dahaka on Thu May 21, 2009 11:38 pm

    私は日本ラブ I LOVE JAPAN
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    Re: Word of the day

    Post by dahaka on Thu May 21, 2009 11:30 pm

    SparkNotes: Today's Most Popular Study Guides

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    Re: Word of the day

    Post by dahaka on Thu May 21, 2009 11:28 pm

    www.gutenberg.org
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    Re: Word of the day

    Post by dahaka on Thu May 21, 2009 11:27 pm

    There are over 28000 free books in the Project Gutenberg Online
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    Word of the day:Egregious

    Post by Lily on Thu May 21, 2009 10:09 pm

    Egregious(adjective)
    Definition: Extremely flagrant; glaringly, even outrageously conspicuous.
    Usage: Flagrant means "glaringly conspicuous" and is not as pejorative as "egregious." The meaning of "egregious" goes beyond that of flagrant and refers only to something excruciatingly bad.
    Suggested Usage: Use this adjective sparingly and only in extreme circumstance, for example: "Calling the archbishop 'dude' was such an egregious error of judgment, I can't believe you said it!" or "It was so egregiously moronic to stuff the turkey with the cranberry sauce, I don't care what they had to eat!" Here is hoping nothing egregious ever happens to you.
    Etymology: This word began with a better meaning: Latin egregius "outstanding" from ex- "out of, from" + grex (greg+s) "the herd," i.e. "standing out from the herd." Akin to congregate (with the herd), segregate (apart from the herd), and aggregate (add to the herd). Remember, these last three are etymologies, not the meanings of the words.
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    Word of the Day:Acuminate

    Post by Lily on Wed May 20, 2009 8:57 pm

    Acuminate (adjective)
    Definition: Pointed or pointy, coming to a sharp point.
    Usage: The verb is acuminate [ê-'kyu-mi-neyt] "to sharpen (an object or point in discourse)." The adjective is very common in the description of leaves that taper to a point (an acuminate leaf). But it may be used to refer to anything, concrete or abstract, that comes to a point.
    Suggested Usage: Have you ever wanted to call your boss a pointy-head without getting fired? Boy, do we have the word for you today! Because this word sounds like "acumen," unless your chief is too smart to deserve this epithet, his chest will swell with pride when you say, "Learning from someone with such an acuminate head on his shoulders as you have is so rewarding." The reward is hearing yourself tell off your boss without repercussion. Of course, you may enjoy this word in the usual way, too: "I thought it was a very acuminate point she developed; it could not have been clearer."
    Etymology: Latin acuminat-us past participle of acumina-re "to make pointed, sharpen," akin to acumen, "a point, acuteness, cunning." Acumen is derived from acuere "to sharpen" itself from acus "needle" (Greek akis "needle"). Going back farther, the underlying root *ak- developed via Germanic into English "edge" and "ear" (ear or spike of grain). This root also metathesized to *ka- and acquired the suffix -men. The stem *ka-men turns up in English "hammer" and Russian kamen' "stone."
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    Re: Word of the day

    Post by Lily on Tue May 19, 2009 9:22 pm

    Confabulate (verb)
    Definition: To chat, converse; (psychology) to fill lapses of memory with fabrications that one believes are facts.
    Usage: The process is "confabulation," the person confabulating is a confabulator and the adjective is "confabulatory." The word is often clipped to "confab" and used as a noun or verb, but such usage is slang and sounds very hokey.
    Suggested Usage: The real problem with the clipping, "confab," is that it is too abrupt, given the mellifluent roll of the original: "We had a wonderful evening of heady wines and even headier confabulation." With both "fable" and "fabulous" lurking beneath the surface of the word, it possesses an air of intrigue lacking in the prosaic alternative, "conversation." Now, the psychological usage offers new possibilities even for ordinary confabulation, "The old folks spent the evening confabulating their childhoods as though they remembered every detail."
    Etymology: Latin confabulatio "conversation" based on con "with" + fabulare "to talk" from fabula "talk" whence English "fable" and "fabulous." "Fabula" comes from fari "to speak," distant cousin to Greek pheme "saying, speech" (as in euphemism "good saying") and phone "voice, sound" from phonein "to speak" which we find in "phonology," "phonetic," "telephone," "symphony," among others. In English it turns up as "ban," from Old English bannan "to summon, proclaim."

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    Word of the Day:Cosmopolite

    Post by Lily on Mon May 18, 2009 3:31 pm

    Cosmopolite(noun)
    Definition: A citizen of the world, a person endowed in many cultures; (Ecology) a species found in many parts of the world.
    Usage: It sounds like the chief ingredient for a light-weight electronic mop but a cosmopolite is far from that. A cosmopolite is usually taken as the antithesis of a patriot. However, Tennyson wrote in 1885, "That man's the best Cosmopolite, Who loves his native country best," so the two do not mutually exclude each other. The adjective is "cosmopolitan" [kahz-mê-'pah-lê-tên]: New York is a cosmopolitan city by virtue of hosting many different cultures from around the world.
    Suggested Usage:
    Cosmopolites first and foremost love to travel about the world, "Gerard is such a pest around the apartment; thank heaven, he's a cosmopolite whom I seldom see." "Provincial" is the antonym of the adjective: "Angus thinks his taste in food is cosmopolitan because he likes both Southern and Pennsylvania Dutch cooking."
    Etymology: From Greek kosmopolitis "citizen of the world" based on kosmos "world" + politis "citizen" from polis "town, state" also found in "metropolis," "politics," "police," and "acropolis." The Sanskrit reflex of the same PIE root is pur "city," found in Singapore, originally Singa Pura "Lion City" (PIE [l] became [r] in Sanskrit). For a bigger slice of PIE, read our FAQ sheet.


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