Department of English

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A Guide For Creative Thinking

Thu Sep 17, 2009 3:12 am by BHSoft

A Guide For Creative Thinking by Brian Tracy
Einstein once said, “Every child is born a genius.” But the reason why most people do not function at genius levels is because they are not aware of how creative and smart they really are.I call it the “Schwarzenegger effect.” No one would look at a person such as Arnold Schwarzenegger and think how lucky he is to have been born with such …


Africain Literature

Wed Mar 04, 2009 8:15 pm by Lily

Things Fall Apart is a 1959 English-language novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first African novels written in English to receive global critical acclaim. The title of the novel comes from [url=http://www.answers.com/topic/william-butler-yeats-3]


Algeria's Newspapers ...

Wed Mar 04, 2009 1:11 pm by Lily

study study study study



http://www.algeria press.com/
http://www.algeria press.com/alkhabar.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elwatan.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/echoroukonline.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elmoudjahid.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/liberte.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/horizons.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/el-massa.htm
[url=http://www.algeria-press.com/ech-chaab.htm]…


Algerian Vote

Thu Apr 09, 2009 12:39 pm by Lily

Algerians are voting in a presidential election which opposition groups have described as a charade.












American English

Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:00 pm by Maria

Going to is pronounced GONNA when it is used to show the future. But it is never reduced when it means going from one place to another.

We're going to grab a bite to eat. = We're gonna grab a bite to eat.
I'm going to the office tonight. = I'm going to the office tonight.

2. Want to and want a are both pronounced WANNA and wants to is pronounced WANSTA. Do you want to can also be reduced …

American Slangs

Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:54 pm by Maria

airhead: stupid person.
"Believe it or not, Dave can sometimes act like an airhead!"

amigo: friend (from Spanish).
"I met many amigos at Dave's ESL Cafe."

ammunition: toilet paper.
"Help! We're completely out of ammunition!"

antifreeze: alcohol.
"I'm going to need a lot of antifreeze tonight!"

armpit: dirty, unappealing place.


An Introduction to the British Civilization

Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:54 am by Maria

University of Batna First Year
English Department G: 6-7-8-9
General Culture

[center]An Introduction to the British Civilization

*The United Kingdom :

Full Name : The UK's full and official name is the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".

Location: The United Kingdom (UK) of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country …

Announcements and News

Thu Mar 05, 2009 2:55 am by Lily


"Dear students , we would like to inform you that , from now on , your marks can be consulted through your Website ...Let's surf ! bounce bounce Wink

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

Sun Apr 12, 2009 11:32 pm by Lily

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

The process of applying for a research studentship begins with the identification of a potential supervisor. If you already know a staffmember who is willing to work with you to develop a research proposal,please start by contacting them. If you do not have a supervisor inmind already, …



    Article of the Day

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    Lily
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    How to mind your manners at an English-speaking dinne

    Post by Lily on Sun Jan 30, 2011 1:08 pm

    How to mind your manners at an English-speaking dinner


    Eating in a foreign country is not only about understanding the menu! Good table etiquette means knowing both what to say and how to behave. Read on to make sure you’re behaving properly at an English-speaking dinner table!
    1. In an English-speaking country, cutlery refers to knives, forks and spoons (eating utensils). Everyone gets confused from time to time about which utensil to use. The basic rule is to start from the outside and work inwards (towards your plate).
    2. During the meal, if you need to leave the table to go to the bathroom, simply say "Please excuse me for a moment." You should also do this if you need to answer a phone call. While you can leave your cell phone on silent mode, it is more polite to turn it off.
    3. Slurping (making a 'slurp' sound with your mouth) is something you should avoid at all costs! Be especially careful not to slurp when you are having soup or noodles!
    4. Even if you have eaten a lot, your host will often try to encourage you to eat more. If you've really had enough, say "Thank you, but I really couldn't eat another bite" or "I'm stuffed!", which is an informal way of saying 'very full'.
    5. Indicate you have finished eating by 'closing' your knife and fork, (putting them together on your plate). You can say "What a delicious meal! Thank you so much." to show your appreciation. Wait for everyone to finish before leaving the table.
    6. It is considered rude to reach across the table. If you need the salt, or would like a dish that is not in your immediate area, you can say "Please pass the ...".
    7. Finally, don't worry about every little detail. Nowadays, etiquette is more about displaying graciousness and poise. And when in doubt, just look to your neighbor for clues!


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    Get Up to Speed with Today's Trendy American Phrases

    Post by Lily on Tue Aug 24, 2010 1:30 pm

    Get Up to Speed with Today's Trendy American Phrases













    Feeling a little old and out of touch with the English language?Do people call
    your English “too formal” or “too dated”? In every language, new words
    are constantly being invented and old words are always taking on new
    meanings and to be fluent in a language you have to learn to keep up
    with the “slang.” Here are a few important words and phrases to know.One of the most commonly used slang words is “cool,” which is a word that
    means something is good. If you see a good movie, you can tell your
    friends it was “cool” or if you want to compliment a friend, you can
    call her a “cool person.” However, if someone asks “How are you?” and
    you say “I’m cool” this doesn’t just mean “I’m good.” It means that you
    are feeling content, calm, or relaxed. When you think of this word,
    think of the pleasantly cool feeling of touching ice on a hot day.“Chill”can be used as a synonym for cool, but you can also use this as a verb:
    “Chilling.” We spoken aloud, the “g” is often dropped, so it sounds
    like “chillin.” This word means to spend time doing nothing in
    particular yet still having fun, as in “I spent Friday night chilling
    with my friends.” Much like “cool,” the word connotes feelings of
    contentment and relaxation.One common English slang
    phrase is “feel me” or “feel you,” which means to understand on a deep
    level. After having told a person about something that you feeling
    passionately about, you can ask “Do you feel me?” It’s like asking, “Do
    you understand what I’m telling you?” only the meaning is more
    personal. The polite response is “Yeah, I feel you.”If a
    friend of yours comes up to you and tells you something bad that just
    happened to them, you can sympathize with them by saying, “That’s
    messed up.” This phrase means that a situation or set of circumstances
    seems unfair or unjust. Then, after sympathizing with your friend, you
    can ask, “How are you holding up?” which means that you want to know
    how they’re coping with this “messed up” situation.Finally,
    when you’re saying hello and goodbye friends or acquaintances, there
    are a few different ways things you can do. For instance, Spanish words
    – “Hola” for hello and “Adios” for goodbye – are popular in the US. You
    can also say “Yo” when greeting a person informally, and then ask
    “What’s up?” to ask how they are doing. And when saying goodbye, you
    can say “I’ll catch you later” to mean that you’ll see them some time
    soon.


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    Lily
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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by Lily on Thu Jun 17, 2010 9:17 pm

    Speaking English in Australia


    Ever been to Australia and wondered what everyone was saying? You thought they spoke English in Australia, right? Well, they do, but it's a special kind of English. Here are some helpful tips for talking to Australians.
    Dead horse


    When someone says, "Please pass the dead horse," don't worry, they're not talking about the animal. It's another word for ketchup. Australians usually pronounce it dead 'orse.
    Elbow grease


    If you're trying to open the tight lid of a jar of dead horse, your Australian friends might tell you, "Put some elbow grease into it." Never fear! Your elbows aren't greasy! What they're really telling you to do is try harder.
    Fair crack o' the whip


    Your boss tells you, "I'm going to give you a fair crack o' the whip." Don't be afraid - you have nothing to worry about! It means he's going to give you a fair chance.
    Digger You couldn't dig a hole to save your life, so why do people keep calling out, "Hey digger!" when they see you? Take it as a compliment! This is another word for friend. Australians also use the words mate andcobber.
    Spit the dummy


    You're in a really bad mood and want to be left alone. Your friends tell you, "Don't spit the dummy." This expression has nothing to do with spitting. It really means to sulk or feel sorry for yourself.
    Struth!


    This is short for "is it the truth?" It's a common expression used when you are really surprised about something. For example, if someone just won the lottery, their friends might say "Struth!" It's like saying, "Oh my God!"Australians might also say strike a light or Hogan's ghost.
    Come the raw prawn


    If you think your friend is playing a joke on you, you can say, "Don't come the raw prawn with me!" This is used when you don't believe what you've just been told. It means, don't treat me like a fool!
    Back of Bourke


    You're talking about a place you want to go to and your friend says, "It's all the way out back of Bourke!"What are they talking about? This expression means that the place is in the middle of nowhere.
    Give you what for


    If somebody wants to give you what for beware! This is something parents often say to their children who don't want to do what they're told, and ask "what for?" If someone says, "I'll give you what for," they are basically saying "I'm in no mood to argue. Do what I ask or else!"


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    How to train your memory to recall and retain information longer

    Post by Lily on Sun Apr 18, 2010 11:39 am

    Building Memory Muscle:
    Recall Notice

    Why are sharp memory skills important? "Working memory impacts on every aspect of how our brain works and, as a consequence, every aspect of our lives: from securing our survival, to making savvy business decisions and controlling our emotions," says psychologist Dr. Tracy Alloway. An article by Neil McKay in The Journal (Newcastle, England) describes a "jungle memory training" program developed by Dr. Alloway which helped young students make "massive" improvements in working memory.Dr. Alloway believes that games may also help stretch working memory such as "video games that involve planning and strategy" and Sudoku, but found that "the 'instant' nature of texting, Twitter, and YouTube had a negative impact on the brain cells." So how can you train your memory to work more efficiently? Marlene Caroselli's T&D article "Maximize Your Memory: Improve Your Memory to Present Better, Work More Efficiently, and Lower Stress" explains an approach by Dr. D.P. Devanand of Columbia University's Memory Disorders Center.When you're inputting information, says Dr. Devanand, pay attention to what you're trying to remember, but don't try to retain everything. "To avoid information overload, use filters: Screen incoming ideas for relevancy; As you take in information visually or aurally, train your eyes and ears to filter out the unimportant and catch only what you need."More tips: "Make immediate use of incoming information that you wish to retain. The faster you use it, the more of it you'll remember, Develop your listening and concentration skills." Also, "Remove barriers that prevent the information from entering your brain-for example, noise in the environment or judgments about a person." And "Sharpen your powers of observation."Dr. Devanand offers many more good tips not only for inputting information but also for storing and retrieving it, along with exercises you can use to practice them.How forgetful are you? This Psychology Today Memory Test asks seven simple questions about how well you remember and provides feedback on whether you need to improve.


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    Lily
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    5 pointers for English CVs

    Post by Lily on Sun Mar 14, 2010 11:36 pm

    5 pointers for English CVs

    You might be perfect for the job, but if your resume isn't, you could lose out. A top-notch English resume will set you apart from the competition. Just follow these tips for writing a winning resume and get the job!
    Review your history.


    First, make a list of your previous jobs and educational qualifications. Then, write down everything you can remember including the company information, certificates, degrees, your job titles and duties, and specific accomplishments.
    State your objective.


    An objective is a goal, and many employers want to know your employment goal when you apply to work for them. It helps them determine if you're a good match. Include a heading at the beginning of your resume called"Objective" and then write a short statement. Example: "To work in a dynamic marketing department.
    "Duties or accomplishments?


    A duty is an assigned task. An accomplishment is an achievement - a positive result of your efforts. Employers like to know what your tasks were in past jobs, but they're more interested in what you achieved. So when describing past jobs, brag a little! Cite specific accomplishments. Example: One of your duties was doing staff scheduling, and you solved a big scheduling problem. Write, "Solved scheduling conflict."
    Adjust your grammar.

    Since you have lots to say, but little space, resume writing standards allow for abbreviated sentence construction. Leave out sentence subjects (e.g. I, my manager), possessive pronouns (my/mine, his/hers), and sometimes even articles (the, a). If you're listing more than one accomplishment in a sentence you can replace"and" with a semicolon. Example: "I led an important project and my manager gave me an award" would become"Led key project; awarded by manager."
    Use action verbs.

    Action verbs show a specific action, e.g. solved, managed, initiated, accomplished. Examples of passive verbs are am, was, have and had. In a resume, action verbs make you sound like a motivated, energetic person - just the type someone would want to hire! Example: "Managed a team of 20 employees" sounds more powerful than "Was in charge of 20 employees.


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    Lily
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    express yourself in a polite way

    Post by Lily on Mon Feb 22, 2010 4:32 pm



    1. To interrupt in a polite way, you say:Your answer was: "Excuse me for interrupting" This is correct!
    2


    2. To express your opinion in a meeting, you say:Your answer was: "In my opinion…" This is correct!
    3


    3. To get clarification on something you don't understand, you say:Your answer was: "I don't get it. Can you explain it better?" This is incorrect!

    The correct answer is: "I don't see what you mean. Could you explain in more detail, please?"
    4


    4. Someone has misunderstood what you said. To correct the information in a professional way, you say:Your answer was: "Sorry, I think you misunderstood what I said." This is correct!
    5


    5. You didn't quite catch what someone said. To ask them to repeat themselves, you say:Your answer was: "I missed that. Could you say it again, please?" This is correct!
    6
    . You need to step out of the meeting for a few minutes. What do you do?Your answer was: Discretely step out of the room without interrupting the meeting This is incorrect!

    The correct answer is: Raise your hand and excuse yourself
    7


    7. You completely disagree with what someone has just said. How do you tell them in professional manner?Your answer was: "Unfortunately, I see it differently." This is correct!
    8


    8. You notice that the meeting is running behind. You want to keep everyone on track. What do you do?Your answer was: Politely say: "Sorry to interrupt, but I think we're running out of time". This is correct!
    9


    9. Someone asks you a question that you don't know the answer to. What do you say?Your answer was: "Let me double-check and I will get back to you as soon as possible." This is correct!


    10. When you want to shift the meeting to a new topic, what do you say?Your answer was: "Can we change topics now, please?" This is incorrect!

    The correct answer is: "Now that we discussed X, let's move onto…"


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    theghostgirl

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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by theghostgirl on Thu Dec 31, 2009 1:39 pm

    What a brightful idea, it's really nice to have such english life.
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    Lily
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    Saving money in English

    Post by Lily on Wed Dec 30, 2009 1:04 pm

    Money talks! Saving money in English

    Did you know that English can help you save money? The English language is full of advice on how to save for a rainy day. So if you are tired of penny-pinching, read on to learn the meaning of these useful expressions!
    Penny-pinching. This expression means to save money, or describes someone who is unwilling to spend money. For example, I have to do some penny-pinching this month if I want to buy that coat!
    A penny saved is a penny earned. This means that not spending money is almost the same as earning it because it will still be in your pocket!
    The best things in life are free. A similar saying is Money isn't everything, in other words money can't buy the most important things in life, like love or friendship or health.
    Saving for a rainy day means putting away money for the future, or saving for an emergency.
    Penny wise, pound foolish. This expression describes a person who is extremely careful about spending small amounts of money, but careless when it comes to larger sums.
    A fool and his money are soon parted. This proverb reminds us that foolish people do not know how to hold on to their money!
    Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise. This is a famous saying of Benjamin Franklin, meaning if you go to sleep early and wake up early you can get rich!
    Money doesn't grow on trees. This expression means that money is not easily obtained. Parents frequently tell their children this if they constantly want to buy things!
    Money talks. This is a modern expression which means that money is powerful, or that money makes things happen.
    In for a penny, in for a pound. This proverb has come to mean that if you start something you may as well finish it, even if you have to devote much more effort than you expected. The original meaning was that if the punishment is the same, people will commit the offence which brings the greatest profit.
    [b]


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    BHSoft

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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by BHSoft on Thu Sep 17, 2009 4:23 pm

    that's what I needed to know to improve my English language a long time ago.
    Thank you so much.
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    Lily
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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by Lily on Fri Aug 21, 2009 11:36 pm

    How to say no in English



    Has this ever happened to you? Your boss asks if you can spend all night at a dinner meeting even though you have to go to you best friend's birthday party.
    There are always times we have to say no. But how do we do it without being rude or insulting? Here are some English phrases that might help you to say no without hurting the feelings of the person who wants you to do something.
    I can't right now, but maybe later. This mean perhaps in the future.
    Unfortunately, I've had a few things come up. This means something unexpected has happened.
    I'm trying to focus on finishing off some other things. This is another way of saying you have some unfinished business.
    I'm sorry I can't. This simply says it's impossible for you.
    I can't at that time, but I'm happy to help you with something else later. This is very polite. You say no but offer you help for other things.
    Sorry but that isn't my strong suit. This is another way of saying you won't be good at that.
    I'm sure you will do fine on your own. This is a polite way of telling someone to do it themselves.
    I'm afraid I'm committed to something else. Say this if you have other plans.
    I really don't enjoy that kind of activity. Or, I don't like to do that.
    I'm sorry, but I have an emergency to attend to. This says you have something urgent you must do.
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    Business English for beginners

    Post by Lily on Fri Jun 26, 2009 10:53 pm

    Business English for beginners

    Want to know the key to great business English? Be polite and professional!You don't have to be fluent to make a good impression, either. Here are some shortcuts for turning beginners into pro's!
    Good morning/afternoon/evening
    To greet a friend, you might say, "Hi! How are you?" In business, however, it's more appropriate to greet someone by saying, "Good morning/Good afternoon/Good evening." Include their last name, too: "Good morning, Ms. Smith."
    How may I help you?
    No matter what field you're in, much of your work probably involves handling requests or providing assistance. So when someone calls or comes to you for help, whether it's a customer or your boss, smile and say, "How may I help you?" or "What can I do for you?" Be careful to not simply say, "What do you want?"This phrase often comes across as rude, especially if spoken with the wrong intonation (a falling tone at the end of the sentence can make it sound impolite).
    I'm sorry/I will
    Whensomething goes wrong, no one likes to hear excuses. So first apologize,and then take action. If you can't answer a question or meet a request,start with, "I’m sorry ? It's the best way to defuse a conflict before it starts. For example, if you don't know an answer, say, "I’m sorry, I don’t know the answer." But don't stop there! Follow with what you will do: "But I will find out." "I'm sorry" says you care about their concern, and "I will" assures them you'll help.
    Would you mind?/Could you?/I'd appreciate.
    Unless you're the top dog (the boss), you don't want to sound like you're giving orders. Phrasing requests in question form is much better than issuing a statement. "Would you mind looking at this report?" or "Could you take a look at this?" is more appropriate than, "Look at this report." When you make requests politely your colleagues will be much more likely to happily comply!
    In my opinion/I'm afraid I don't agree
    In business, when discussing a new idea or project, you need polite ways to get your thoughts across or indicate you don't agree. Using the phrase "In my opinion ? at the beginning of your sentence tells the listener that you're still open to other points of view. If you don't agree with someone, don't say, "That's the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard!" Instead use, "I'm afraid I don’t agree." Choosing your words carefully will make the person you’re working with much more willing to listen to you, too!
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    What’s Your Learning Style?

    Post by Lily on Sun Jun 14, 2009 3:56 pm

    What’s Your Learning Style?


    Many experts believe that we use one of our senses more than the others when we learn. The idea is that we learn best in one of four ways: visual (seeing), auditory (hearing), kinesthetic (moving) or tactile (touching).
    Visual learners...


    • enjoy looking at pictures and graphic displays
    • use lists to organize their thoughts
    • recognize words when they see them displayed
    Tips for the visual learner:

    - Draw pictures of vocabulary words and diagrams of grammar rules
    - Use flashcards to review new words
    - Visualize a conversation with the new words you’ve learnt
    - At Englishtown, watch the movies and do the simulation activities for each lesson
    Auditory learners...


    • enjoy listening to dialogues and discussions
    • like to hear spoken instructions
    • use rhythm and sounds to help remember information [
    Tips for the auditory learner:
    - Sing vocabulary words, memorize songs or make rhymes to remember grammar rules
    - Read out loud as much as possible
    - Record yourself speaking English and play back the tapes for
    review
    - At Englishtown, focus on the listening activities, conversation classes, voice chat rooms and other listening activities
    Kinesthetic learners..


    • find it difficult to sit in front of the computer for long periods of
    • learn best when trying something for themselves
    • use movement as a memory aid
    Tips for the kinesthetic learner:
    - Don’t sit at the computer for too long
    - Take breaks often
    - Chew gum while you’re studying!
    - Mentally review your lessons while exercising
    - At Englishtown, stay active by attending conversation classes regularly
    Tactile learners...


    • enjoy working with their hands
    • remember words by writing or typing them on the keyboard
    • learn well through practical activities like projects and games
    Tips for the actile learner:

    • Participate in role-playing and drama activities as much as you can.
    • Use objects to help you remember vocabulary words
    • Print out Englishtown’s flashcards and take them with you when you’re out
    • You learn by doing, so practice English as much as you can!
    What’s your learning style? Are you a combination of two or more styles?
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    5 proven ways to close a deal in English

    Post by Lily on Sun Jun 07, 2009 12:07 pm

    5 proven ways to close a deal in English
    Let's face it. Negotiation and sales is tough work, and even tougher when it's not done in your native language. Often, when English is not spoken correctly, it can come across as too pushy or even too rude – which ruins all chances for the perspective deal. Don't let English be the downfall. Improve your selling skills with our handy guide – and get the deal of a lifetime!
    Use "you"
    When speaking with a client, try to begin your sentences with the words you or your. You'll find this grabs their attention more quickly than beginning with phrases like "I think…" or "Let me tell you about…" because it focuses the attention on them, not on you. For example, "You'll find that your English improves very rapidly when you study at Englishtown!"
    Add something extra
    Everyone likes to feel like they are getting something for free! If it's possible, try to add a little something extra to the deal to make the customer or client feel special. Use phrases like, "If you buy now, I can…" and "If we sign the deal soon, I can…" to put a little additional pressure on the customer to commit quickly. For example, "If you sign up for Englishtown today, you can get one week free!"
    Offer proof
    Sometimes customers just don't believe salespeople are telling the truth, and there can often be mistrust between two companies negotiating a deal. It's important that your clients grow to trust you, so find something you can show them that will prove the quality of what you're offering. Begin with the phrase, "Don't just take my word for it." Then, follow up with a way to offer them proof, like "Look at what these other people have to say." or "Look at the rate of success. The numbers speak for themselves." It's also very helpful if the client can try out your product or service. For example, "Why don't you try out Englishtown yourself by signing up for a free trial?"
    Ask questions
    When your clients begin to hesitate, don't back down, but don't be too pushy, either. Instead you need to listen. Ask them questions that will help them be honest with you such as, "What concerns do you have?", "What's holding you back?" or "What's stopping you from signing up for Englishtown today?" Your clients will appreciate the fact that you care enough to really listen.
    Be willing to negotiate
    Finally, after your customers have shared their concerns, you have to be willing to compromise a bit to give them what they want. Use expressions in formats such as, "We'll lower the price, if you agree to pay cash." and "We're prepared to make this deal exclusive, providing you sign a 10-year contract with us."
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    The Top 10 Confusing English Words

    Post by Lily on Sun May 24, 2009 11:33 pm

    The Top 10 Confusing English Words


    Should you accept an invitation or except one? Do you eat dessert or desert after your meal? English is full of confusing words. Here are some tips on using the right word at the right time!
    dessert and desert
    Dessert is a sweet dish, while the desert is hot, dry and full of sand.
    accept and except
    To accept means to receive or agree to something, while except means excluding.
    there and their
    The former is an adverb of place while the latter is a possessive pronoun e.g. Their house is over there.
    principle and principal
    Principles are beliefs, values or basic truths, while principal means the head of a school, or the main thing.
    advice and advise
    The former is a noun while the latter is a verb, so you can advise someone by giving them good advice.
    borrow and lend
    To borrow means to receive something as a loan, while to lend means to give something as a loan. E.g. Can I borrow your car? Sorry, I can't lend it to you today.
    despite and although
    These have a similar meaning but are used differently. Despite is a preposition while although is a conjunction. E.g. He won the race despite his injury. He won the race although he had an injury.
    affect and effect
    The former is a verb while the latter is a noun, e.g. The effect of the war is enormous; it has affected all sectors of the economy.
    personal and personnel
    Your personal details include your name, age and nationality, while personnel means the employees of a company.
    assure and ensure
    To assure someone means to remove doubt or reassure them, while ensure means to make certain that something happens. E.g. I assured him that you would be there, so please ensure that you get to the meeting on time.
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    English for cover letters

    Post by Lily on Thu May 14, 2009 11:18 am

    English for cover letters


    Landing that dream job doesn't only require a well-written resume - you'll also need a sparkling cover letter to formally introduce yourself and present your value. Follow this guide to prepare a winning cover letter.
    Stay on target
    When you begin your cover letter, get to the point immediately. Explain why you're writing and include the title of the position you're interested in. You may even want to say where you heard of the opening: "I am writing to express my interest in the Sales Manager position advertised on your Web site. I have enclosed a copy of my resume for your review.
    "Match your skills
    A cover letter is your chance to convince the employer that you're the perfect candidate, so identifying the position's skill requirements is an important first step. Then, include clear examples from your previous experience which reveal that you possess these skills, and finally sum up with something like this: "I am confident that these combined experiences make me an ideal candidate for this position.
    Demonstrate English ability

    If an English cover letter is required, it's a fantastic opportunity to demonstrate your smooth writing skills and professionalism. Keep in mind, however, that long sentences don't necessarily indicate fluency. Keep your sentences short and clear; do not try to over-impress by writing complex sentences, which can often leave the reader tired and confused.
    Sell yourself

    When you're writing a cover letter, you should always remember your mission – to sell yourself! Demonstrating what you can do for the employer, not the other way around, will make you stand out from the crowd. Use action verbs such as facilitated, developed and managed to describe your job responsibilities, and make claims such as "I strongly believe I possess the right combination of skills and experience you are looking for" with confidence.
    Proofread!
    Sitting down, writing and then immediately sending your cover letter will guarantee one thing – mistakes! Once you have written your cover letter, make sure you proofread it at a later time and ask a friend to read it as well. Look closely for spelling and grammatical errors and make sure it's not too long. Finally, put yourself in the employer's shoes, or pretend that you are the employer, and decide if you would hire the candidate who wrote the letter. If not, go back and make revisions until you have a sparkling cover letter!
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    Raise your English reading skills

    Post by Lily on Fri May 08, 2009 9:35 pm

    Raise your English reading skills



    Do you break out into a sweat when you have to read in English? Staring at a page full of unfamiliar words can be overwhelming, even for the most confident of readers. Here are five useful tips that can help make reading a rewarding experience rather than a dreaded chore.
    Be prepared

    Never rush straight into reading. Before you begin, look at the title and any pictures. This will give you a good idea of the topic. Think about what you already know. Next, predict what the reading will be about. Think about what you want to learn and write down any questions you may have. Preparing yourself for the reading in this way will get you started before the first page is even turned

    At first sight
    Now that you've got a general idea of the topic, you can begin. Read the entire text over once without stopping. Don't worry about the details just yet. In the beginning, all you should be trying to do is get a feeling for the main idea. This is called skimming. When you're done, think about how much you've understood and remembered.

    It's all in the details

    Remember those questions you wrote down before? Now it's time to find the answers. Read the text again, but this time, read it slowly and carefully. Look for any words or phrases that relate to your questions. This is called scanning. If you come across anything else that's interesting and important, underline that too. Once you're finished, you should have a fuller understanding of the text.
    Words, words, words!
    You don't have to understand every single word to understand the text. Pick out key words or phrases you don't know and write them down. But don't reach for the dictionary just yet! Try to guess the word's meaning from context - the words or phrases around it. After you've taken a guess, go ahead and use the dictionary to see how close you were. You might be pleasantly surprised!
    Final reading
    By this time, you should be familiar with the text. Read it one more time. You can now focus on any unusual grammar structures or sentence styles. When you've finished, sit back and think about everything you've just learned. That wasn't so difficult, was it?
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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by Lily on Wed Apr 29, 2009 11:14 am

    Five ways to have fun with English

    They say laughter is the best medicine,and we've got just the prescription for you! Get the giggles with these fun word games you can play with your friends. Who says studying can't be fun?
    Beginnings and endings
    This game focuses on beginning and ending letters of words. The first player says a word, and the next player must quickly say a word that begins with its final letter. For example:
    Player 1: English
    Player 2: heart
    Player 3: telephone
    Player 4: elephant
    If a person can't think of a word, hesitates, or gets the letter wrong,they are out of the game. The last person left is the winner.
    I spy ...
    Pick an object that you can see from where you are, for example, an apple on your table. Then say, "I spy with my little eye something red," corresponding to the object's color. Then have a friend guess what it might be. "Is it the lamp?" They can keep guessing until they get it right!
    As an alternative, you do not have to use a color. Choose any adjective: "I spy ... something round" or "I spy ... something small."
    Charades
    Reveal your acting skills with this game! First think of a popular movie title, and then act it out word by word. Your friends should shout out guesses, and the first person to get it right should take their place on center stage.
    Who am I?
    Send one person out, and decide what famous person he or she will be. The player returns and asks "Who am I?" Everyone should give one clue:
    Player 1: Who am I?
    Player 2: You are a businessman.
    Player 1: Who am I?
    Player 3: You are very rich.
    Player 1: Who am I?
    Player 4: You are an American.
    After listening to all the clues, the player has three chances to guess, for example, "Am I Bill Gates?"
    Word associations
    Begin by saying any word. The next player must quickly say the first related word that comes to mind:
    Player 1: Love
    Player 2: Heart
    Player 3: Red
    Player 4: Fire
    Continue this process quickly. If someone takes too long, or if the word is not related, that person is out. The last person to stay in the game is the winner!
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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by Lily on Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:31 pm

    [b]How to speak English in the air

    Want to travel internationally? You can do it with English! English is the international language of the aviation industry. Just learn this key airport vocabulary and fly anywhere in the world with confidence.
    Do you have an e-ticket or a paper ticket? - An e-ticket is an electronic ticket, meaning your purchase record is stored in the airline's computer system. All you need to check in is your identification. A paper ticket is a physical document. Just like a concert ticket, if you lose it, you have to buy another!
    Are you checking baggage or carrying on? - Baggageis the general term for everything you've packed - suitcases,backpacks, boxes. If you have large items or more than one bag, you need to check your baggage - that is, have it stored in the airplane's cargo hold. A carry-on is a noun referring to the small baggage you take on the plane with you.
    Would you like a window or aisle seat? - Never get stuck in a middle seat again! If you enjoy looking out the window then say you want a window seat. Or if you'd rather be free to get up and stretch your legs, tell them you'd like an aisle seat.
    Here's your boarding pass. - Your boarding passis the document issued at the airport with your seat number anddeparture gate information. You need it in order to pass throughsecurity and get on your flight.
    Is this flight non-stop or does it have a layover? - A layover is a stop at an intermediate point in your journey. Non-stop means you fly directly to your destination with no stops in between.
    After the security check, board your flight at gate 3. - The security check is where you and your carry-on bags are checked for dangerous items. Gate refers to the area where you wait for and then board - get on - your plane.
    Is my flight delayed or on-time? - When your flight is going to be late departing, you'll hear that it has been delayed. On-time means your flight will leave as scheduled.
    Pick up your bags at baggage claim. - Baggage claim is the area where you retrieve your checked baggage - the bags you didn't carry onto the airplane with you.
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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by Lily on Sun Apr 12, 2009 10:23 pm

    Cyber English - How does it work?

    For centuries, having live contact with a teacher in a classroom has been considered an essential part of learning. But with the influx if the Internet, traditional attitudes are changing and education is being transformed! When it comes to learning English, studying online can be a cost-effective and convenient choice for many around the world - from full-time students to business professionals. But how does it really work?

    A world of teachers

    First, you should look at online learning not as having no teachers, but instead, as having many! For example, the curriculum at online English school Englishtown.com was developed by a team of native English teachers. Their combined experience and expertise enhances the learning environment for students around the world. Additionally, learners have opportunities to hear a multitude of native English accents - from the US to England to Australia.

    At the movies

    It's time to hit the lights and grab some popcorn! As you first step into a lesson, you'll watch a movie that illustrates a certain aspect of English. Listen to the dialogue between native English speakers to learn new words and phrases and practice your intonation and sentence stress. The topic and grammar demonstrated in the movie will be covered throughout the rest of lesson.

    A well-rounded education

    When it comes to English, there are plenty of skills to build - and at Englishtown you can practice them all. Each lesson is comprised of online activities designed to improve your listening, reading, writing and speaking. Read exciting articles, play some learning games and test your progress!

    Talk to the world

    It's no use studying English if you don't learn how to communicate using it! One of Englishtown's best features is the Virtual Classroom where you can meet teachers and classmates from around the world! With classes every hour on the hour, 24 hours day, you can always find time to speak English in cyber world!

    Essential feedback

    At Englishtown, you're not alone on the path to English fluency. Submit compositions in our Writing Lessons, and a teacher will correct your writing and provide suggestions on how to improve. Active participation in conversation classes can also lead to helpful feedback from our Native English speaking teachers. It's time to take control of your language learning, and at Englishtown, you get all the supplies you need for your journey!
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    Ten tips to build English vocabulary

    Post by Lily on Sat Apr 11, 2009 10:30 pm

    "Ten tips to build English vocabulary" study

    Feeling overwhelmed trying to memorize so many vocabulary words? It doesn't need to be a daunting task! Check out these top strategies and practical pointers that can help you build your word power!
    Connect:It's easier to memorize words based on a common theme. Make your ownconnections between words and possibly organize them in a spider diagram.
    Write: Practically using vocabulary can help it stick in your mind. Write sentences with new vocabulary words or compose a story using a group of words or expressions.
    Draw:Expose the artist in you by drawing pictures related to the words you study. Your drawings can help trigger your memory in the future.
    Act:Get your moves on by acting out words and expressions you learn. Or,imagine and act out a situation where you would need to use them.
    Create: Design flashcards in English and study them in your spare time. Each week make new ones, but continue to review all of them.
    Associate: Assign different colors to different words. This association will help you recall vocabulary later.
    Listen: Think about other words which soundsimilar to the words you're learning, especially complex words.Associate the other words with this new word to help you remember the pronunciation.
    Choose:Remember that topics that interest you will be easier to learn. Therefore, carefully selectwords that you will find useful or interesting. Even the process of making the choice is a memory aid!
    Limit: Don't try to memorize the dictionary in a day!Limit yourself to 15 words per day, and you'll gain confidence instead of feeling overwhelmed.
    Observe: Keep an eye out for the words you're studying when reading or listening to English.
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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by Lily on Wed Apr 01, 2009 12:00 pm

    English telephone phrases you have to know


    If you're like most English learners, you find it difficult to make phone calls in English. But if you're traveling abroad or working in a foreign company, using English on the phone is essential. So how do you conquer this last obstacle to fluency? Prepare yourself for any telephone situation with the following phrases and techniques.
    Introductions
    Start any telephone conversation by introducing yourself: "Hello, this is Peter Jones. If you answer the phone and the caller fails to identify himself, you can say: "May I ask who's calling, please?"
    Asking for someone / Making a request
    If you're calling to talk to a specific person, then phrase your request as a polite question, e.g. "May I speak to Rachel Smith, please?" When you have an extension number but no name you can say: "Could I have extension number 635?" But if you're calling with a specific purpose, then a statement works best: "I’m calling to make a reservation."
    Holding and transferring
    "Please hold" is telephone language for "just a moment". When you need to be transferred"Connecting your call..." or "Please hold, I'll transfer you.".” If you call a business at a busy time, you might hear only a brief, "Hello, please hold!"
    Leaving a message
    When the person you're calling isn't available, be prepared to leave a message. You might use voice mail answering machine (a machine that records messages onto a tape). If you're talking to an operator, they'll ask: "Would you like to leave a message?" Or you can say, "May I leave a message?" Be sure to leave your phone number if you want the person to return your call. This is called a call back number.
    Asking the speaker to slow down
    If you're not sure you'll understand everything in English, be honest. Tell the speaker immediately: "My English isn't very strong, could you please speak slowly?" Most people will appreciate your honesty and will be happy to oblige.
    Write it down
    If you're nervous about telephoning in English, it's helpful to prepare a script. Write out a brief outline of what you need to say. You can use it to organize your thoughts beforehand and as a reference if you get confused during the call.
    Remember your manners
    It's very important to sound polite on the telephone. Use phrases like Could you', and 'Please' when making requests. And always remember to finish a conversation with 'Thank you' and 'Goodbye'!
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    English proverbs to keep you positive

    Post by Lily on Fri Mar 20, 2009 10:29 pm

    English proverbs to keep you positive

    Throughout the ages, proverbs have expressed well-known wisdom and advice. Take a look at these common English proverbs, and apply their truths to your language learning.
    The first step is always the hardest
    Sometimes starting something new can be difficult. If you've never studied English before, you might be faced with apprehension. However, one you get started, you won't regret it!
    If at first you don't succeed, try, try again
    Sometimes it's easy to give up when we don't succeed, instead of persisting. But don't lose confidence with learning English! Everyone has different learning styles, and with a little work, you can find the style that's right for you.
    No pain, no gain
    Without hard work, you won't achieve anything. Learning English may seem like a difficult task, but with a little dedication, you'll gain big rewards!
    Don't cry over spilled milk
    If something has already happened that you can't change, don't be upset about it. Maybe you regret the time you've wasted not studying English,but instead of feeling sorry about the past, focus on your future - a future with English.
    Make hay while the sun shines
    You should take advantage of the time and opportunities you have to do the things you want. Isn't now a great time to make the most of Englishtown's resources?
    Practice makes perfect
    Don't be disappointed if you aren't an expert at something right away.Sometimes you may not feel your English progress, but the more you practice, the more fluent you will become.
    There's more than one way to skin a cat
    There are many ways to achieve the same goal. Maybe you've given up on English because you don't have the time to attend classes. If so, take a look at online learning at Englishtown – you can study at any time anywhere and get the same results.
    You reap what you sow
    The amount of success you have is based on the amount of work you put into it. Everyone is aiming for success, so make sure you're giving your work and your English studies your all!
    Two heads are better than one
    Two people working together can accomplish more than one person alone. Why don't you join a conversation class or find a study partner to practice your English with?
    Don't put off until tomorrow what you can do today
    Stop procrastinating, and do everything you can today. English has never been as vital to career success as it is now – and there is no better time than the present to study English! Take that first step, and sign up for Englishtown today.
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    Re: Article of the Day

    Post by Lily on Sun Mar 15, 2009 11:16 am

    Learn English without getting out of bed

    It's Saturday morning. Sunlight streams through your window; you slowly stretch and open your eyes. You're exhausted from a busy week and wish you could stay in bed all day. But you know you shouldn't waste time – you ought to get up and study English. If only there was a way to do both … But there is! In fact, there are a number of ways to practice and study English while lazing in bed.
    Turn up the radio
    If your city has a fun English or bilingual radio show, put it on in the morning to help you wake up. The cheerful voices and music will get your day off to a great start. Listen to the DJ introduce the songs, and try to understand what he/she says. Remember that learning English doesn't have to be boring; finding fun and practical ways to improve your listening is a key to staying motivated. If you do it often, one day you might wake up to excellent listening skills!
    Lose yourself in a book
    Nothing beats kicking back (relaxing) in bed with a good book. The key is that you've got to enjoy what you read! Whether it's a best-selling novel or an exciting comic book, read something on your level that interests you. Articles or books that are too dry or too difficult will put you back to sleep! By reading something enjoyable, you are having fun as well as inputting thousands of correct English sentences into your brain. You'll be able to draw upon these resources the next time you need to speak or write in English. Remember to keep a dictionary and notebook on your bed-side table to look up and record difficult words and passages.
    Go to class
    Now, wait a minute … doesn't that mean you have to get out of bed? Not anymore! The Internet has a mountain of resources for studying English, and online schools such as Englishtown.com are even offering conversation classes. By signing up, you can step into the virtual classroom without stepping out of bed. Talk live with a native English speaking teacher and classmates from around the world any time you want, 24 hours a day! Each class revolves around a topic and gives you plenty of opportunities to practice speaking. So, the next time you don't feel like getting out of bed, grab a laptop and go to class in your pajamas!
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    10 secrets of success for English speakers

    Post by Lily on Fri Mar 13, 2009 6:12 pm

    Do you get tongue-tied when you try to talk in English? Want to know how to get more speaking confidence? Even the best English speakers had to start somewhere, so read on to learn the secrets of their success.
    Putting the pieces together
    To speak English well, a number of different elements need to work together: knowing (and choosing) suitable vocabulary, using the right grammar and sentence patterns, and producing the correct sounds, stress patterns, rhythm and intonation. You have to work on these individual elements if you want to see improvements.
    Two-way process

    Speaking is about interacting with another person, and involves listening as well as talking. Check that the other person is following, by using conversation strategies like emphasizing key words, rephrasing, or using expressions like You know what I mean? or Don't you agree?
    It's not just what you say...
    Non-verbal communication is very important for effective speaking, even for native English speakers.Use gestures, body language and facial expressions for explanation or emphasis, and try to read what the other person's body language is saying.
    Sing a song!
    Music is a great way to improve your speaking skills, practice the rhythm of the language and learn some useful expressions. Look up the lyrics (song words) to your favorite songs on the Internet, and then practicing singing aloud.
    Take a chance!
    You need the right attitude to improve your English. Look for every opportunity to practice speaking, like talking to people at parties, approaching a foreigner who looks lost, or just putting up your hand when your teacher asks question.
    Think in English every day.
    This is a great way to improve your spoken English, and you can do it anywhere, anytime. At home, you can talk to yourself while doing everyday tasks like preparing a meal. If you are on the train or bus, then describe the people around you (in your head, not aloud!), and when you go to sleep, go over the day's events in English.
    Listen to the sound of your own voice.
    Even though you might not like hearing your own voice, this is a very useful way to find out what's wrong with your spoken English. Record yourself speaking and then listen to the tape, or ask a native speaker for some advice.
    Keep a talking journal.
    Record your thoughts in English before you go to sleep at night. You can play the tape at the end of the year to look back on important events, as well as monitor your English progress.
    Take extra classes.
    If you feel you need extra practice and want to interact with other English learners, why not join a language class? There are plenty of language schools around, or even online courses. Don't think you can learn to speak on the Internet? In Englishtown's teacher-led classes, all you need is a headset and microphone to talk to the world!
    Find English-speaking friends.
    If you are really serious about becoming a good English speaker, you need to meet people you can speak to in English. This does NOT only mean native speakers, though. English is spoken by many more people as a second language than as a native language, and being able to understand different accents is very important.
    Improve your spoken English
    Live conversation classes with native English teachers.
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    Article of the Day

    Post by Lily on Sat Mar 07, 2009 12:41 am

    Lost in Translation – to English?

    You don't speak English, but you have to attend conferences and read documents in English for work. What do you do? Rely on translation? Wrong! Translation is a fine short-term solution, but what many people don't realize is just how much meaning and information is lost when translating from one language to another.
    For example, look what got lost in translation for these multinational companies: - An advertising campaign for Schweppes Tonic Water in Italy translated tonic into toilet.-A car manufacturer's promotion in Belgium stated that its car had a body by Fisher. But as translated into Flemish, it read, corpse by Fisher. - A Japanese company sold knives in the United States with this warning: Caution: Blade extremely sharp. Keep out of children. - When an importer translated Made in TurkeyFabrique en Dinde. Dinde means turkey in French, but it's the bird, not the country! The country is Turquie. into French, he wrote, Every language has a unique grammar system as well as thousands of word meanings and connotations. Just think how many times you ask for clarification when speaking your own language! Now imagine how much you miss when you rely on an interpreter to translate English into your language.
    Translation is an art. Even the best translators aren't a guarantee you'll understand a language's nuances. For example, books and poetry that are extremely popular in their original language can be harshly criticized in other languages simply because of bad translations.
    Take, for example, famous 18th-century Scottish poet Robert Burns. His poems have been translated into many languages, and he is popular all over the world – except in Japan. Scholars discovered recently that the words that make his poems beautiful in English were completely lost in the Japanese versions. One famous verse came out sounding like this: "Good luck to your honest friendly face, Great King of the sausages." What? No wonder no one liked Burns in Japan!
    What happened to Burns in Japanese could happen to you, too, if you rely on an interpreter not only to translate from English into your language, but to communicate what you say into English!Though it can be a challenging task, the only way to truly understand and communicate in English is to do it yourself. If you persist on the path of English learning, you'll be rewarded with a whole new approach to expressing yourself.


    Last edited by Lily on Wed Apr 22, 2009 4:43 pm; edited 2 times in total

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    Re: Article of the Day

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      Current date/time is Mon Jun 25, 2018 4:17 pm