Department of English

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A Guide For Creative Thinking

Thu Sep 17, 2009 3:12 am by BHSoft

A Guide For Creative Thinking by Brian Tracy
Einstein once said, “Every child is born a genius.” But the reason why most people do not function at genius levels is because they are not aware of how creative and smart they really are.I call it the “Schwarzenegger effect.” No one would look at a person such as Arnold Schwarzenegger and think how lucky he is to have been born with such …


Africain Literature

Wed Mar 04, 2009 8:15 pm by Lily

Things Fall Apart is a 1959 English-language novel by Nigerian author Chinua Achebe. It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first African novels written in English to receive global critical acclaim. The title of the novel comes from [url=http://www.answers.com/topic/william-butler-yeats-3]


Algeria's Newspapers ...

Wed Mar 04, 2009 1:11 pm by Lily

study study study study



http://www.algeria press.com/
http://www.algeria press.com/alkhabar.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elwatan.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/echoroukonline.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/elmoudjahid.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/liberte.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/horizons.htm
http://www.algeria-press.com/el-massa.htm
[url=http://www.algeria-press.com/ech-chaab.htm]…


Algerian Vote

Thu Apr 09, 2009 12:39 pm by Lily

Algerians are voting in a presidential election which opposition groups have described as a charade.












American English

Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:00 pm by Maria

Going to is pronounced GONNA when it is used to show the future. But it is never reduced when it means going from one place to another.

We're going to grab a bite to eat. = We're gonna grab a bite to eat.
I'm going to the office tonight. = I'm going to the office tonight.

2. Want to and want a are both pronounced WANNA and wants to is pronounced WANSTA. Do you want to can also be reduced …

American Slangs

Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:54 pm by Maria

airhead: stupid person.
"Believe it or not, Dave can sometimes act like an airhead!"

amigo: friend (from Spanish).
"I met many amigos at Dave's ESL Cafe."

ammunition: toilet paper.
"Help! We're completely out of ammunition!"

antifreeze: alcohol.
"I'm going to need a lot of antifreeze tonight!"

armpit: dirty, unappealing place.


An Introduction to the British Civilization

Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:54 am by Maria

University of Batna First Year
English Department G: 6-7-8-9
General Culture

[center]An Introduction to the British Civilization

*The United Kingdom :

Full Name : The UK's full and official name is the "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland".

Location: The United Kingdom (UK) of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country …

Announcements and News

Thu Mar 05, 2009 2:55 am by Lily


"Dear students , we would like to inform you that , from now on , your marks can be consulted through your Website ...Let's surf ! bounce bounce Wink

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

Sun Apr 12, 2009 11:32 pm by Lily

Applying for Research Study in the Department of English

The process of applying for a research studentship begins with the identification of a potential supervisor. If you already know a staffmember who is willing to work with you to develop a research proposal,please start by contacting them. If you do not have a supervisor inmind already, …



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    Post by Lily on Tue May 26, 2009 9:45 pm


    John Wayne View Poster
    We guess with a name like Marion, a guy might have to make himself into a John Wayne. Western movie icon John Wayne was born Marion Morrison on this date in 1907. His breakthrough role was in John Ford'sStagecoach in 1939; "the Duke," as he was often called, went on to star in dozens of films, including Fort Apache (1948), Sands of Iwo Jima (1949), The Quiet Man (1952) and The High and the Mighty (1954). The Searchers (1956), Rio Bravo (1959), The Alamo (1960) and The Green Berets (1968) further sealed his place in history as the strong, imposing hero. By the time he got to play marshal Rooster Cogburn in True Grit (1969), Hollywood was ready to give Wayne his Oscar for Best Actor.

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    Post by Lily on Mon May 25, 2009 2:56 pm


    Yoda
    Today we celebrate the 65th birthday of Frank Oz. The puppeteer extraordinaire was the hands and voice behind MuppetsBert, Fozzie Bear, Grover, and Miss Piggy, and he created Yoda, for The Empire Strikes Back. Oz likes to pull the strings of actual actors, too, having gotten a taste of what it's like to be a director when he assisted Jim Henson in directing The Dark Crystal. Since then, Oz has made a name for himself directing such live-action comedies as Little Shop of Horrors, In and Out, Bowfinger, and Death at a Funeral. Occasionally, he makes his way to the front of the camera; he's had acting roles mostly in comedies, including The Blues Brothers, Trading Places, and Spies Like Us.
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    Post by Lily on Sun May 24, 2009 10:46 pm


    Mary Had a Little Lamb View Poster
    Who knew that this simple rhyme would become such a hit? "Mary Had a Little Lamb" was published on this date in 1830 by Sarah Josepha Hale. She was said to have based the rhyme on an actual incident: one day, a young girl named Mary Sawyer took a lamb to her school in Sterling, MA. The poem became instantly popular and Hale went on to write nearly 50 novels and books of poetry. She also became the first female magazine editor, editing Godey's Lady's Book. Thomas Edison recited "Mary Had a Little Lamb" in testing his new invention, the phonograph, in 1877.
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    Post by Lily on Sat May 23, 2009 2:46 pm


    The Who, c. 1978 View Poster
    The term "opera" took on a different meaning when The Who released Tommy, forty years ago today. The first rock opera, Tommy moved quickly up the charts; it reached No. 2 in the UK and No. 4 in the US, where it remained on the charts for 47 weeks. Pete Townshend wrote most of the opera, which was about a psychosomatically deaf, mute and blind boy who became a pinball wizard and a cult hero. The movie based on the album came out in 1975, and in 1993 the Broadway version won several Tony and Drama Desk awards.
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    Post by Lily on Fri May 22, 2009 1:01 pm


    Sherlock Holmes
    It's elementary... Legendary detective Sherlock Holmes may have been a master of the art of observation and deduction, but he didn't gather all the clues unaided. Depending not only on his trusty sidekick, Dr. Watson, Holmes frequently sought help from a band of street urchins whom he dubbed the Baker Street Irregulars. Fans of Holmes later formed a group, adopting the name BSI. Still active today, they've included such illustrious figures as Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Harry Truman, as well as lesser-known names. The only real criterion for membership is an active, deep-rooted devotion to all things Sherlockian. The creator of the object of all this devotion, Arthur Conan Doyle, was born 150 years ago today. A physician by trade, Doyle wrote four novels and 56 short stories featuring Holmes and company.
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    Post by Lily on Thu May 21, 2009 9:54 pm


    Fingerprinting View Poster
    Fingerprinting has been considered a key method of identification for more than 100 years. Henry Faulds and Sir Francis Galton worked on methods of identifying individuals through the patterns of loops, whorls and lines on their fingertips. The Galton method was particularly popular; both the British and US police continue to use that method in identification, replacing the Bertillon System. Seventy-five years ago today, Oskaloosa, IA, became the first municipality in the US to fingerprint all its citizens.
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    Post by Lily on Wed May 20, 2009 3:11 pm


    Joe Cocker
    Life magazine once called Joe Cocker "the voice of all those blind criers and crazy beggars and maimed men who summon up a strength we'll never know to bawl out their souls in the streets." The gravelly-voiced rocker is one of the few musicians who performed in both the original Woodstock in 1969 and the 25thanniversary Woodstock reunion in 1994. In performance, Cocker is known to make jumpy movements; the late comedian John Belushi capitalized on that with a wildly successful spoof on Saturday Night Live in the '70s. Happy birthday to Joe Cocker, who turns 65 today.
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    Post by Lily on Tue May 19, 2009 8:53 pm


    Tower of London View Poster
    The Tower of London, today one of London's most popular tourist sites, was at one time a far less desirable place to visit. Originally a fortress on the River Thames, the complex became a prison and a site of beheadings. Many of the prisoners arrived at the fortress via boat; they would travel under London Bridge, where they were rattled to see the heads of previously executed prisoners. Then, they would enter the area through Traitors' Gate. Among other well-known guests of the Tower were Sir Thomas More, Sir Walter RaleighCatherine Howard and Lady Jane Grey. Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII'sand queens like second wife, was beheaded at the Tower of London on this date in 1536, having been convicted of adultery. Some say she still haunts the tower.
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    Post by Lily on Mon May 18, 2009 3:18 pm


    Halley's Comet View Poster
    Records show that stargazers have been tracking Halley's Comet from as far back as 240 BCE. The comet was named for Edmond Halley, who observed it in 1682 and identified it as the same one observed in 1531 and 1607, based on its having the same elements as the previous two. He correctly predicted it would return every 75-76 years. The comet — the only periodic comet visible to the naked eye — was seen from Earth as it passed in front of the sun on this date in 1910. Seen again in 1985-86, the next perihelion passage of Halley's Comet is expected to be in 2061.
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    Post by Lily on Sun May 17, 2009 2:44 pm


    Frog in Flight View Poster
    On your mark, get set, hop! It's time for the annual Calaveras County Fair and Jumping Frog Jubilee. Begun in 1928 — and taking place this year from May 14-17 — the event was inspired by Mark Twain's tall tale, "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County," about a gambler who fills his opponent's frog with quail shot before a frog-jumping contest. It was Twain's first published story. Today, frogs from all over will compete to see which can jump the farthest. A "Frog Welfare Policy" is in place, ensuring the humane treatment of the amphibians. The current record jump of 21 ft, 5 3/4 in (6.4 m, 14.6 cm) was set by Rosie the Ribeter in 1986. There is a cash prize of $5000 for breaking that record.

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    Post by Lily on Sat May 16, 2009 12:33 pm


    Junko Tabei
    In May 1953, word reached the world that Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay had scaled Mt. Everest, the first men to conquer that height. Twenty-two years later, on this date in 1975, Japanese climber Junko Tabei became the first woman to achieve that same goal — this, in spite of the fact that on the way, Tabei and others in her group were buried by an avalanche. Tabei was unconscious under the snow before a Sherpa guide dug her out, and then she continued the climb. Her love of mountaineering kept Tabei climbing; in 1992 she became the first woman to scale each of the Seven Summits.
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    Post by Lily on Fri May 15, 2009 10:52 am


    Going Airmail
    Air travel celebrates two separate milestones on this date. The first regular US airmail service took off between Washington, DC, and New York City on this date in 1918. Special airmail postage stamps were issued for use with the new service. The pilot got lost en route and never completed that first trip. On the same date, twelve years later, the first airline stewardessEllen Church — went on duty aboard a United Airlines flight between San Francisco and Cheyenne. Church, who was a nurse and a pilot, convinced the airline that a flight attendant could help allay passengers' fears. In the late 1970s, stewardesses were renamed "flight attendants," and more and more men have joined the ranks of on-board hosts. Designated US Air Mail is now obsolete, since all first-class mail is now routinely carried by air.
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    Post by Lily on Thu May 14, 2009 10:41 am


    Gainsborough's'The Blue Boy' View Poster
    Thomas Gainsborough was born 280 years ago today. Famous for his painting of portraits (The Blue Boy, 1770) and landscapes (The Harvest Wagon, 1767; The Watering Place, 1777), Gainsborough took particular pains to use light to effect different moods in his paintings; he sometimes painted by candlelight, and he frequently advised patrons on the best way to hang his paintings to properly catch the light. Though he most enjoyed painting landscapes,Gainsborough relied on his portraits to pay the bills.
    Quote: "I'm sick of Portraits and wish very much to take my Viol da Gamba and walk off to some sweet Village where I can paint Landskips and enjoy the fag End of Life in quietness and ease." Thomas Gainsborough
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    Post by Lily on Wed May 13, 2009 9:51 am


    Robert Pattinson
    Sometimes things just work out. Just ask Hollywood heartthrob Robert Pattinson, whose small role opposite Reese Witherspoon in 2004's Vanity Fair was left on the cutting room floor. The casting agent felt terrible that Pattinson was cut and didn't even know it until he sat through the entire premier performance. The same agent was beginning casting for Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, and called Pattinson in for an early meeting. He won the role of Cedric Diggory. He has said of the overnight fame that it brought, "The day before [the Harry Potter London premiere] I was just sitting in Leicester Square, happily being ignored by everyone. Then suddenly strangers are screaming your name. Amazing." After his sizzling portrayal of vampire Edward Cullen in Twilight, Pattinson's anonymous days are over.
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    Post by Lily on Tue May 12, 2009 10:15 pm


    Yogi Berra
    "When you come to a fork in the road, take it." "A nickel isn't worth a dime today." "Anyone who is popular is bound to be disliked." Happy 84th birthday to one of baseball's greatest catchers and managers, Yogi Berra, known as much for his quirky way of expressing himself as he is for his prowess at baseball. Three times the American League'sMVP, Berra was the first manager to lead both an AL team (NY Yankees) and an NL team (NY Mets) to the World Series. Along the way, he inadvertently entertained with his Yogiisms. Berra's comment about them? "I never said most of the things I said."
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    Post by Lily on Mon May 11, 2009 9:58 pm


    A New Use for an Old Tire View Poster
    We don't know who invented the wheel, but it has been reinvented over and over again. The first evidence of the item was in diagrams on ancient clay tablets: there were pictures of a potter's wheel that was used in Ur in Mesopotamia, c. 3,500 BCE. It is thought that the Mesopotamians first used it for transportation on their chariots, sometime around 3,200 BCE. Wheels developed in Europe around 2,000 years later. The B.F. Goodrich Company reinvented the wheel on this date in 1947, when it announced the development of the tubeless tire.
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    Post by Lily on Sun May 10, 2009 9:38 am


    Assassinated Leaders View Poster
    Today's an auspicious day for the dark side: assassins John Wilkes Booth (1838-1865), James Earl Ray (1929-1998) and Mark David Chapman (52) were all born on May 10. In 1865, Booth shot and killed President Abraham Lincoln, who was attending a performance at Ford's Theatre. Ray took the life of Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968, as King stood on a hotel room balcony in Memphis,TN. And in 1980, Chapman murdered John Lennon as Lennon arrived at his home in NYC. Twelve days after assassinating Lincoln, Booth was cornered and shot by a Union soldier. Ray died incarcerated, after serving nearly 30 years of his 99-year sentence. And Chapman remains in prison, having twice been denied parole on his 20-years-to-life sentence.
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    Post by Lily on Sat May 09, 2009 10:05 am


    Happy Mother's Day View Poster
    Today and tomorrow are dedicated to our mothers. In a recent study sponsored bysalary.com, it was determined that an average stay-at-home mother would earn $116,805 annually, including overtime, if she received a paycheck. According to the survey, the run-of-the-mill full-time mom works about 100 hours a week, filling the jobs of daycare teacher, housekeeper, cook, computer operator, janitor, psychologist, driver, nurse, maintenance worker, laundry machine operator, facilities manager and CEO. Most mothers don't get a paycheck, but they're happy to be compensated with a bunch of flowers, a warm hug, a handmade card or a simple "I love you" from their children. On this date in 1914, US PresidentWoodrow Wilson proclaimed a special day to make sure that children remember to tell their mothers that they are appreciated.
    Happy Mother's Day!
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    Post by Lily on Fri May 08, 2009 2:58 pm


    Great White Shark View Poster
    There are over 300 varieties of sharks, found mostly in warm waters. Like other fishes, sharks breathe by taking in water and passing it over their gills. Because of their great weight, sharks need more oxygen than most fishes. This, coupled with the fact that they do not have swim bladders to keep them buoyant, forces sharks to keep swimming in order to breathe and to stay afloat. Their keen senses of hearing and smell allow them to track prey from miles away. Peter Benchley, the author of Jaws — the book and movie that made so many afraid to go into the water — was born on this date in 1940.

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    Post by Lily on Thu May 07, 2009 12:08 pm


    Ludwig van Beethoven View Poster
    The Choral Symphony, including "Ode to Joy," was Ludwig van Beethoven'sHis use of voices in the final movement of the symphony represented the first time a major composer incorporated the human voice into a symphonic piece, equal to the other instruments. When the piece premiered in Vienna on this date in 1824, Beethoven himself co-conducted the orchestra and chorus. He was already deaf by this time, and witnesses to the event reported that Beethoven — apparently several measures behind the performance — continued conducting the piece even after it was completed, not stopping until a singer turned him around so he could see the audience on its feet, thunderously applauding.
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    Post by Lily on Wed May 06, 2009 10:41 am


    Entering the Channel Tunnel
    Fifteen years ago today, the Channel Tunnel linking England to France officially opened. Hailed as one of the century's greatest feats of civil engineering, it took some 15,000 workers seven years to dig the 50 kilometer/31 mile long underwater tunnels below the English Channel, from Folkestone to Coquelles (near Calais). Popularly known as the Chunnel, it consists of three tunnels: two rail tunnels and a central service tunnel for maintenance and ventilation. Passengers can travel either by ordinary rail coach or within their own motor vehicles, which are loaded onto special rail cars. With trains traveling through the tunnel at speeds as high as 100 miles (160 km) per hour, the trip takes about 35 minutes.
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    Post by Lily on Tue May 05, 2009 9:54 am


    Biking to Work
    Here's why we should ride bicycles, instead of driving cars: It's good for the environment and it's good for us. Cars are the biggest single polluter of the air in the US, with short trips polluting up to three times more per mile than long trips. In an age when more of us are fighting the battle of the bulge, riding a bike can knock off hundreds of calories a day; those who bike-ride regularly improve their heart, lungs and circulation. People who exercise more are found to be healthier and miss less work and school. Bicycle-riding is economically sound: bike riders don't pay for gas, parking or automobile insurance. Ten bikes can be parked in the space needed for one automobile. May is National Bike Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists. The third Friday in May is Ride-a-Bike-to-Work Day. Don't forget to wear your helmet!
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    Post by Lily on Mon May 04, 2009 8:02 pm


    Piano Keys View Poster
    Bartolomeo Cristofori, the Italian harpsichord maker who is credited with inventing the first piano (late in the 17th century), was born on this date in 1655. The oldest of Cristofori's existing pianos is in New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Outwardly, it resembles a harpsichord, with 54 keys on its single keyboard. The other two Cristofori pianos are in Rome and Leipzig. The word "piano-forte" came from the Italian for "soft-loud," indicating the ability to play the piano at different volumes. At first, the piano did not meet with great success. Critics didn't like the variations in tones and they found it very difficult to play. Several years later, instrument-maker Gottfried Silbermann refined the piano's design and composers such as Johann Sebastian Bach began playing and writing music for the new instrument.
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    Post by Lily on Sun May 03, 2009 11:22 am


    Frankie Valli
    Frank Valley, Frankie Tyler, Frankie Valle and the Romans, The Four Lovers, The Wonder Who? The names may differ, but the falsetto is unmistakable these -were all aliases for Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons. Though they had a very slow start, when they finally hit it in October 1962, they hit it big, with three No. 1 singles in a row: "Sherry," "Big Girls Don't Cry" and "Walk Like a Man." All three songs were written by Four Seasons' songwriter and keyboardist Bob Gaudio. Valli and Gaudio have continued to produce music for the last four decades and the group saw a resurgence of popularity with the Tony-winning Broadway musical based on the group's story, Jersey Boys. Happy 75th birthday to Frankie Valli.
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    Post by Lily on Sat May 02, 2009 12:18 pm


    'Good Housekeeping'
    c. 1919 View Poster
    Good Housekeeping magazine went on sale for the first time 124 years ago today. The magazine offered articles on home economics, relationships, fashion and grooming tips, as well as pieces about celebrities and works of fiction. In 1900, the Good Housekeeping Institute was founded as a kind of "experiment station," and since 1909, the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval has routinely been awarded to products that are well-designed and useful to consumers. They include household goods, clothing, services, and much more. The seal of approval carries with it a limited warranty, promising a replacement or full refund for any approved item that proves defective within two years of purchase.

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